A 14-year-old striker, Fola La Follette and Rose Livingston are shown in a glass negative from the George Grantham Bain Collection, 1913. The photograph shows suffrage and labor activist Flora Dodge “Fola” La Follette, social reformer and missionary Rose Livingston, and a young striker during a garment strike in New York City in 1913. (Libraryof Congress)

A 14-year-old striker, Fola La Follette and Rose Livingston are shown in a glass negative from the George Grantham Bain Collection, 1913. The photograph shows suffrage and labor activist Flora Dodge “Fola” La Follette, social reformer and missionary Rose Livingston, and a young striker during a garment strike in New York City in 1913. (Libraryof Congress)

Women’s right to vote marks centennial

League of Women Voters of Clallam County

One hundred years ago, (some) women earned the right to vote.

Let’s start at the beginning which is the signing of the Constitution of our country in 1789.

To be eligible to vote in the 13 states, a person had to be 21 years of age or older, a white male, a property owner and, in some states, a Protestant.

It was understood that women were not included.

Sixty-seven years passed before only the property requirement was eliminated in all states in 1856.

Another 12 years passed and a Civil War fought before the 14th Amendment to the Constitution passed in 1868, which gave citizenship and the right to vote to former male slaves.

Southern states began to implement poll taxes and literacy tests to keep African American men from voting.

Intimidation and violence were also used to suppress the black vote.

In an attempt to rectify some of this behavior, the 15th Amendment was passed in 1870 which (theoretically) prevented states from denying the right to vote on grounds of “race, color, or previous condition of servitude.”

Voting laws continued to evolve.

People of Chinese ancestry were barred from voting in 1882.

It was 1952 before all Asian Americans (including Japanese) were given the right to vote.

The Supreme Court ruled in 1887 that Native American men could vote if they gave up their tribal affiliation but Congress later said they would have to first apply for citizenship.

It was 1947 before all Native Americans were given the right to vote regardless of tribal affiliation.

When and what brought women the right to vote?

Women’s suffrage began in the United States in 1848 when the first Women’s Rights Convention was held in Seneca Falls, N.Y.

A set of dynamic and dangerous events were propelled into motion.

Many diverse women bravely stood up for what they believed was their right as citizens of the United States.

In 2020, we celebrate these women and the Centennial Anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment which allowed some women the right to vote.

The League of Women Voters of Clallam County will tell more about the history of women’s right to vote in subsequent columns.

________

For more about the League of Women Voters of Clallam County, see Lwvcla.org

More in News

Mariia Bush stands with her two daughters, Madison, 9, and Avery, 6, during the Juneteenth Protest Against Racism and Hate on Saturday in downtown Sequim. (Matthew Nash/Olympic Peninsula News Group)
Alleged racial incident draws 140 to rally

Police continue investigation as alleged victim plans not to press charges

Teen hurt in bicycle wreck in stable condition

A teenage girl was in stable condition at Harborview… Continue reading

Gamma variant infections increasing statewide

Vaccination clinics set on North Olympic Peninsula

Dr. Ann Sabatino comes this week to Chimacum on the Smilemobile, which provides dental care to babies, children and adults who are uninsured or covered by Medicaid. To make an appointment, phone 888-286-9105. photo courtesy of the Smilemobile
Smilemobile in Chimacum this week

The Smilemobile, provider of dental care for babies, children, teenagers… Continue reading

Sequim City Council considers expanding utility discount program

Larger commercial utility base rates could increase in 2022

Jefferson County masking mandate expected to end June 30

State requirements for unvaccinated residents to mask believed to continue

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News
Volunteers bore holes and prepare the site on Friday for the beginning of a community build of the Generation II Dream Playground, scheduled to begin on Tuesday, at Erickson Playfield in Port Angeles.
Community build begins Tuesday

Volunteers to create Dream Playground II

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News
The site of a proposed 106-room hotel being planned by the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe near the downtown Port Angeles waterfront sits idle on Friday as the tribe works with the city on infrastructure and environmental issues.
More delay for Elwha Hotel

Hurdles mount for $25 million project

Most Read