Christopher Thomsen of Port Angeles takes a cellphone photo of the tall ship Lady Washington as it does a beauty pass of City Pier after arriving in Port Angeles in June 2019. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News)

Christopher Thomsen of Port Angeles takes a cellphone photo of the tall ship Lady Washington as it does a beauty pass of City Pier after arriving in Port Angeles in June 2019. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News)

Lady Washington to offer sails, tours in Port Ludlow

Tall ship is replica built to celebrate state’s centennial

PORT LUDLOW — The Lady Washington will be open for sails and tours today through Sunday at the Port Ludlow Marina.

Two-hour Adventure Sails are set at 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. today through Sunday from the marina.

Self-guided dockside tours will be available between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

A $5 donation per person is suggested for the tours, which take about 30 minutes.

Adventure sails cost $69 for adults 13 to 61; $59 for seniors 62 and older, students with valid ID and both active and inactive military with valid ID; and $49 for children 12 and younger.

Reserving tickets in advance is recommended for Adventure Sails. Reservations also are urged for dockside tours. To buy tickets and reserve spots on tours, go to the Grays Harbor Historical Seaport website at historicalseaport.org.

Adventure Sails offer guests the experience of sailing as it was done for hundreds of years. Travelers will learn about the history of American maritime exploration, sing a few sea shanties and perhaps help haul lines and set sails.

During tours, visitors are free to walk around on deck and in open compartments to see a little of what it is like to live aboard a working tall ship.

The Lady Washington is not wheelchair accessible. Crews can assist visitors if contacted in advance.

The wooden-hulled Lady Washington was built in 1989 in Aberdeen to commemorate the centennial of Washington’s statehood. It was launched on March 7 of that year as a full-scale replica of the original Lady Washington.

In 1788, the original Lady Washington, which had been constructed in the 1750s as a single-masted sloop, was refitted as a two-masted brig before a voyage around Cape Horn.

It was the first American vessel to make landfall on the west coast of North America.

The ship also was America’s first to visit Honolulu, Hong Kong and Japan.

Lady Washington opened the black pearl and sandalwood trade between Hawaii and Asia when King Kamehameha became a partner in the ship.

The modern Lady Washington, constructed as a brig, was researched by historians and traditionally built. It is a U.S. Coast Guard inspected and certified passenger sailing vessel.

Over the years, Lady Washington has appeared in several motion pictures and television shows, including Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl, Star Trek: Generations, Once Upon A Time, and Revolution.

For several years, the Lady Washington often was accompanied by the Hawaiian Chieftain. That steel-hulled tall ship, built in 1988, was sold last summer.

The Lady Washington is scheduled to be at the Northwest Maritime Center in Port Townsend from June 1-7.

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