Federal grants available for coastal climate change projects

SEATTLE — Coastal communities in the state that are threatened by climate change are eligible for $225 million in federal grants.

Cities, counties and tribes can apply for coastal resilience projects under the Climate Ready Coasts initiative.

The funding is through the $2.855 billion set aside for salmon habitat recovery and coastal resilience in the Biden-Harris Infrastructure Law, U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Mountlake Terrace, chair of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, said in press release.

These programs are part of a $2.855 billion investment in salmon habitat recovery and coastal resilience investment in the Biden-Harris Infrastructure Law that was signed into law last year.

All of these funding sources will be available to Washington state’s orca and salmon recovery networks, nonprofit organization, local and state agencies, and tribal governments.

Funding possibilities are:

• Transformational Habitat Restoration and Coastal Resilience Grants ($85 million) — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will accept proposals for projects estimated between $1 million and $15 million federal cost. The application deadline is Sept. 6.

• Coastal Habitat Restoration and Resilience Grants for Underserved Communities ($10 million) — NOAA will accept proposals for projects estimated to cost between $250,000 and $500,000 federal cost. The application deadline is Sept. 30.

• Coastal Zone Management Habitat Protection and Restoration Grants ($35 million) — Letters of intent are due by July 29, 2022. NOAA will accept proposals for project engineering, design and planning projects between $200,000 and $500,000; habitat restoration projects between $2 million and $6 million; and land conservation projects between $1 million and $4 million over the award period.

Applicants may propose projects with a federal funding request less than or more than these amounts, up to $6 million.

• Coastal Zone Management Habitat Protection and Restoration Capacity Building ($5 million) — Awards up to $450,000 in funding for the life of this three-year award. Of that total, up to $150,000 may be awarded in Fiscal Year (FY) 2022, an additional $150,000 may be awarded in FY 2023, and $150,000 may be awarded in FY 2024. The application deadline is July 30.

• National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS) Habitat Protection and Restoration Grants ($12 million) — Letters of intent are due by July 29.

NOAA will accept from the NERRS designated state lead agency or university proposals with a federal funding levels for project engineering, design and planning project between $200,000 and $350,000; habitat restoration projects between $2 million and $4 million; land conservation projects between $500,000 and $1.5 million over the award period.

Applicants may propose projects with a federal funding request less than or more than these amounts, up to $4 million.

• National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS) Habitat Protection and Restoration Capacity Building ($3 million) — The NERRS designated state lead agency or university may request up to $300,000 in funding for the life of this three-year award. Of that total, up to $100,000 may be awarded in FY 2022, an additional $100,000 may be awarded in FY 2023, and $100,000 may be awarded in FY 2024.

The application deadline is July 30.

• Marine Debris Removal Grants ($56 million): NOAA will accept proposals with a funding level of between $150,000 and $15 million over the award period. The application deadline is Sept. 30.

• Marine Debris Challenge Competition ($16 million) — The National Sea Grant Office anticipates funding between five and 12 projects of up to three years’ duration. Applicants may request up to $3 million. Letters of Intent are open through Aug. 9.

• Marine Debris Community Action Coalitions ($3 million) — The National Sea Grant Office anticipates about $3 million in FY 2022 and 2023 to fund between five and 12 marine debris community action coalitions.

Applicants may request up to $300,000. Letters of Intent are open through Aug. 16.

For information see www.noaa.gov/climate-resilience-funding.

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