David Grisman, beside his artist and musician wife Tracy Bigelow Grisman, has contributed a private mandolin lesson to the Northwind Auction online now. Grisman, known as the “Paganini of the mandolin,” includes his music books, “Dawg Grass,” “Dawg Latin,” “Dawg Jazz” and “Dawg Roots.” (Diane Urbani de la Paz/Peninsula Daily News)

David Grisman, beside his artist and musician wife Tracy Bigelow Grisman, has contributed a private mandolin lesson to the Northwind Auction online now. Grisman, known as the “Paganini of the mandolin,” includes his music books, “Dawg Grass,” “Dawg Latin,” “Dawg Jazz” and “Dawg Roots.” (Diane Urbani de la Paz/Peninsula Daily News)

Northwind auction raising money for art

New classes, shows offered

PORT TOWNSEND — Northwind Art, the nonprofit organization born of the marriage of two entities at the start of 2021, has a lot going on right now: new gallery shows, a new catalog of classes — oh, and a major fundraiser.

The Northwind Virtual Auction, open now through Nov. 14, presents around 80 items, ranging from a private mandolin lesson with David Grisman to a world-traveled whiskey package.

There are works from local artists too, and a sailing-and-sketching outing.

The full catalog can be found at Northwind.org by clicking on the “2021 online auction” banner at the top of the page.

Northwind, formed from the merger of the Port Townsend School of the Arts and the Northwind Arts Center, depends on this event for its future health, said communications manager Tess McShane.

Those who bid on paintings, jewelry, photography, furniture, clothing and classes are not only giving themselves the gift of art, she said; they’re also supporting local artists.

Northwind is promoting another way to boost budding artists. Auction participants can search the catalog for “art supplies” and donate $20 to provide those for a young student in Northwind’s youth programs. And a $150 contribution, via the website’s Donate link, provides a day’s pay for an art teacher giving one of those classes.

Such gifts are completely tax-deductible, McShane noted.

At the same time, “we know it’s a tough year. We’re super grateful for people who give what they can,” she said.

“Just taking a walk down the streets of Port Townsend, imagine if those artists weren’t around,” McShane added.

Northwind seeks to support the creative economy here by offering art classes of various levels and by operating for its part, operating display spaces including downtown’s Jeanette Best Gallery and Artist Showcase and the Grover Gallery. It also has provided art for the walls of the Port Townsend Library.

This month, the new exhibit in the Jeanette Best Gallery in the Waterman-Katz building at 701 Water St., pairs Anne Traver’s ceramic vessels with Kammer’s realist sea-, land- and cityscapes.

A free online talk by the artists is set for 7 p.m. Wednesday; viewers can sign up at Northwind.org under the Exhibits link.

In the Artist Showcase, also in the Waterman-Katz building, the exhibit is titled “10 Years of Artist Showcase: Liz Reutlinger & Wanda Mawhinney.”

This show also features work by Brandy Agun, Jeanne Edwards, James Ferrara, Brian Goodman, Joyce Hester, Meg Kaczyk, Evan Miller, Jim Romberg, Kim Simonelli, Linda Tilley, Diane Walker, Jadyne Reichner, Barbara Lutrell, Sydni Sterling, Egor Shokoladov, Kim Kopp and Sandra Offutt.

At the Grover Gallery, 236 Taylor St., through November, Sandee Johnson has a solo show of pen and ink drawings, collage, paintings and prints. They’re botanically oriented, with real and imaginary elements.

These venues are all open to the public from noon to 5 p.m. Thursdays through Mondays.

Meantime, the Northwind Virtual Auction offers experiences as well as tangible items. A class with Port Townsend painter Max Grover, a tour and demonstration at Caryl Bryer Fallert-Gentry’s quilting studio, and a day sail on Port Townsend and Admiralty Inlet — to be arranged in 2022 — are among the outings up for bid.

The hope is that the auction will raise $50,000 or more, said McShane, who’s optimistic about finishing Northwind’s first year in good shape.

“Port Townsend is so lucky to be a community that really appreciates the arts,” she said.

________

Jefferson County senior reporter Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360-417-3509 or [email protected]

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