The submersible Deep Quest is prepared for unloading at Platypus Marine Inc. in Port Angeles after its arrival from the U.S. Naval Undersea Museum in Keyport on Tuesday. The Deep Quest, which had been on display at the museum, was built and operated by the Lockheed Missiles and Space Co. in the mid-1960s as a prototype deep-submergence rescue vehicle and was operational until 1980. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News)

The submersible Deep Quest is prepared for unloading at Platypus Marine Inc. in Port Angeles after its arrival from the U.S. Naval Undersea Museum in Keyport on Tuesday. The Deep Quest, which had been on display at the museum, was built and operated by the Lockheed Missiles and Space Co. in the mid-1960s as a prototype deep-submergence rescue vehicle and was operational until 1980. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News)

1960s-era submarine to be dismantled in Port Angeles

PORT ANGELES — A prototype 1960s-era submarine made its way through Port Angeles on Tuesday to be dismantled at Platypus Marine Shipyard.

The U.S. Naval Undersea Museum in Silverdale removed the submersible Deep Quest after having it on display for 20 years in its parking lot.

Vessel’s background

The submarine, built in Sunnyvale, Calif., was launched in 1967. It was designed for salvage, seafloor survey and inspection, including coring, shear strength measurement, ocean bottom mapping, color photography and other assignments.

Deep Quest was developed by Lockheed Martin and was never a U.S. Navy submarine, according to the museum.

Its condition was deteriorating and it would require extensive financial resources to properly preserve, so the museum chose to focus funding on Navy vessels.

“Without a full ship-check to ascertain possible environmental concerns, we in good faith cannot offer it to another museum, and therefore have made the decision to recycle it,” according to an email from the museum.