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Tim Morland, front, and Rich Lear of Tualatin, Ore.-based Field Turf USA add fill to the playing surface at the new Monroe Athletic Field on Tuesday at the site of the former Monroe School near Roosevelt Elementary School in Port Angeles. The synthetic turf field, which is expected to be completed by mid-autumn, is being developed by the Port Angeles School District and will be available for community athletic events. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News)

Monroe field prep

Tim Morland, front, and Rich Lear of Tualatin, Ore.-based Field Turf USA add fill to the playing surface at the new Monroe Athletic Field on… Continue reading

 

A crew from Port Townsend Public Works watches as a backhoe removes water-logged timber from a sinkhole on Kearney Street outside the Food Co-op on Tuesday at the start of construction of a traffic circle at the intersection of state Highway 20/East Sims Way and Kearney Street in Port Townsend. Traffic heading eastbound toward Port Townsend will detour at Benedict Street and turn left on Washington Street to return to Highway 20/East Sims Way. Traffic going westbound away from Port Townsend will turn right at Kearney Street and left onto Jefferson Street to continue on Highway 20. The detour configuration will last about four weeks, according to the state Department of Transportation. (Steve Mullensky/for Peninsula Daily News)

Roundabout construction

A crew from Port Townsend Public Works watches as a backhoe removes water-logged timber from a sinkhole on Kearney Street outside the Food Co-op on… Continue reading

 

Peninsula College sophomores Ian Coughran, left, and Ciera Skelly were two of seven students participating in the inaugural Pathway Summer School at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory this summer that focused on education and career development in STEM fields. Both Coughran and Skelly plan to pursue degrees in environmental science. (Paula Hunt/Peninsula Daily News)

Internship through college presents career pathways

Students part of inaugural class at Sequim laboratory

Peninsula College sophomores Ian Coughran, left, and Ciera Skelly were two of seven students participating in the inaugural Pathway Summer School at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory this summer that focused on education and career development in STEM fields. Both Coughran and Skelly plan to pursue degrees in environmental science. (Paula Hunt/Peninsula Daily News)
Actor Erik Odom, a Forever Twilight in Forks Festival regular, and a Very Important Twilighter (VIT) ticketholder prepare for a professional photo at the actor’s signing event on Friday at Tillicum Park. VITs passed through the big tent, meeting Odom as well as Ashley Greene and Rachelle Lefevre. The Twilight series actors greeted ticketholders and signed books and other memorabilia. Volunteers also were in place to take extra photos with the VIT’s cameras/phones. (Christi Baron/Olympic Peninsula News Group)

Forever Twilight Festival in Forks

Actor Erik Odom, a Forever Twilight in Forks Festival regular, and a Very Important Twilighter (VIT) ticketholder prepare for a professional photo at the actor’s… Continue reading

Actor Erik Odom, a Forever Twilight in Forks Festival regular, and a Very Important Twilighter (VIT) ticketholder prepare for a professional photo at the actor’s signing event on Friday at Tillicum Park. VITs passed through the big tent, meeting Odom as well as Ashley Greene and Rachelle Lefevre. The Twilight series actors greeted ticketholders and signed books and other memorabilia. Volunteers also were in place to take extra photos with the VIT’s cameras/phones. (Christi Baron/Olympic Peninsula News Group)
Michael Dashiell/Olympic Peninsula News Group
Sequim middle hitter Jolene Vaara spikes the ball against North Mason on Tuesday at Sequim Middle School. Vaara led the team with 16 kills and seven stuff blocks.

PREP ROUNDUP: Young Sequim volleyball team wins opener

Despite having a young team full of freshmen and sophomores and not having a home court to play on yet, the Sequim volleyball… Continue reading

Michael Dashiell/Olympic Peninsula News Group
Sequim middle hitter Jolene Vaara spikes the ball against North Mason on Tuesday at Sequim Middle School. Vaara led the team with 16 kills and seven stuff blocks.
Author M.B. Thurman reads from her debut novel, “Summoned,” in front of the Miller Tree Inn, aka the Cullen House, during a pre-Forever Twilight in Forks event on Tuesday. M.B. (Mary Beth) and her husband Trent own the Inn. This week’s FTF Festival will also feature other authors at several other venues. (Christi Baron/Olympic Peninsula News Group)
Author M.B. Thurman reads from her debut novel, “Summoned,” in front of the Miller Tree Inn, aka the Cullen House, during a pre-Forever Twilight in Forks event on Tuesday. M.B. (Mary Beth) and her husband Trent own the Inn. This week’s FTF Festival will also feature other authors at several other venues. (Christi Baron/Olympic Peninsula News Group)
Port Townsend Police Officer Jon Stuart, Chief Thomas Olson, Assistant Fire Chief Brian Tracer and Fire Chief Bret Black observe a moment of silence Monday as Jefferson County Sheriff Joe Nole reads a remembrance of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York on Sept. 11, 2001. (Steve Mullensky/for Peninsula Daily News)
Port Townsend Police Officer Jon Stuart, Chief Thomas Olson, Assistant Fire Chief Brian Tracer and Fire Chief Bret Black observe a moment of silence Monday as Jefferson County Sheriff Joe Nole reads a remembrance of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York on Sept. 11, 2001. (Steve Mullensky/for Peninsula Daily News)
Eliott Carey, 5, shapes a mound of clay on a potter’s wheel on the patio of Peninsula College’s ceramics studio Saturday at its second Fall Spectacular. Playing with clay was one of many activities for children, families and adults at the event, which included tours of classrooms and introductions to courses and fields of study, Port Angeles Farmers Market booths, live music and an exhibition of art by college faculty. The event was a way for the people to learn about Peninsula College, meet faculty and staff and connect with community resources. Fall quarter at the college starts Sept. 26. (Paula Hunt/Peninsula Daily News)

Shaping the future

Eliott Carey, 5, shapes a mound of clay on a potter’s wheel on the patio of Peninsula College’s ceramics studio Saturday at its second Fall… Continue reading

Eliott Carey, 5, shapes a mound of clay on a potter’s wheel on the patio of Peninsula College’s ceramics studio Saturday at its second Fall Spectacular. Playing with clay was one of many activities for children, families and adults at the event, which included tours of classrooms and introductions to courses and fields of study, Port Angeles Farmers Market booths, live music and an exhibition of art by college faculty. The event was a way for the people to learn about Peninsula College, meet faculty and staff and connect with community resources. Fall quarter at the college starts Sept. 26. (Paula Hunt/Peninsula Daily News)
Riptide, a 47-foot wooden boat from Port Ludlow owned by Pete Leenhouts, built in 1927 by Schertzer Bros. of Seattle, is gently nudged to the dock by volunteer harbormasters on Thursday in preparation for today’s opening of the 46th annual Wooden Boat Festival at Point Hudson Marina in Port Townsend. The festival runs through Sunday. (Steve Mullensky/for Peninsula Daily News)

Festival preparation

Riptide, a 47-foot wooden boat from Port Ludlow owned by Pete Leenhouts, built in 1927 by Schertzer Bros. of Seattle, is gently nudged to the… Continue reading

Riptide, a 47-foot wooden boat from Port Ludlow owned by Pete Leenhouts, built in 1927 by Schertzer Bros. of Seattle, is gently nudged to the dock by volunteer harbormasters on Thursday in preparation for today’s opening of the 46th annual Wooden Boat Festival at Point Hudson Marina in Port Townsend. The festival runs through Sunday. (Steve Mullensky/for Peninsula Daily News)
“Catch of the Day” helped Bruce Fryxell, Olympic Peninsula Camera Club president, take home the gold medal for the top photograph in his group at the National Inter-club Photo Competition. (Bruce Fryxell)
“Catch of the Day” helped Bruce Fryxell, Olympic Peninsula Camera Club president, take home the gold medal for the top photograph in his group at the National Inter-club Photo Competition. (Bruce Fryxell)
Serina Fast Horse, of Sicangu Lakota & Blackfeet Tribes, left, talks with Jacy Bowles, of Xicana and Diné descent, as they walk to the former Elwha Dam site during the 2023 Tribal Climate Camp on the Olympic Peninsula on Aug. 16 near Port Angeles. Participants representing at least 28 tribes and intertribal organizations gathered to connect and share knowledge as they work to adapt to climate change that disproportionally affects Indigenous communities. More than 70 tribes have taken part in the camps that have been held across the United States since 2016. (Lindsey Wasson/The Associated Press)

Tribes consider how to combat climate change

Native nations gather west of Port Angeles to discuss practices

Serina Fast Horse, of Sicangu Lakota & Blackfeet Tribes, left, talks with Jacy Bowles, of Xicana and Diné descent, as they walk to the former Elwha Dam site during the 2023 Tribal Climate Camp on the Olympic Peninsula on Aug. 16 near Port Angeles. Participants representing at least 28 tribes and intertribal organizations gathered to connect and share knowledge as they work to adapt to climate change that disproportionally affects Indigenous communities. More than 70 tribes have taken part in the camps that have been held across the United States since 2016. (Lindsey Wasson/The Associated Press)
Alden Inman, 7, of Port Angeles gets his face painted by Ailey Thibeault during Sunday’s First Federal centennial celebration and community party in downtown Port Angeles. The event featured a day of food, music and children’s activities in honor of the organization’s 100 years as a community bank. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News)

Centennial celebration

Alden Inman, 7, of Port Angeles gets his face painted by Ailey Thibeault during Sunday’s First Federal centennial celebration and community party in downtown Port… Continue reading

Alden Inman, 7, of Port Angeles gets his face painted by Ailey Thibeault during Sunday’s First Federal centennial celebration and community party in downtown Port Angeles. The event featured a day of food, music and children’s activities in honor of the organization’s 100 years as a community bank. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News)
Personnel from East Jefferson Fire and Rescue (EJFR) and Port Townsend police investigate the scene where a Toyota driven by a Quilcene woman crashed into the doorway of Papa Murphy’s pizza shop at 1220 W. Sims Way in Port Townsend before noon on Tuesday. She was not injured, but she was shaken up by the incident that occurred when her foot slipped off the brake pedal and hit the accelerator, according to EJFR Chief Bret Black. (Steve Mullensky/for Peninsula Daily News)

Accelerated instead of braking

Personnel from East Jefferson Fire and Rescue (EJFR) and Port Townsend police investigate the scene where a Toyota driven by a Quilcene woman crashed into… Continue reading

Personnel from East Jefferson Fire and Rescue (EJFR) and Port Townsend police investigate the scene where a Toyota driven by a Quilcene woman crashed into the doorway of Papa Murphy’s pizza shop at 1220 W. Sims Way in Port Townsend before noon on Tuesday. She was not injured, but she was shaken up by the incident that occurred when her foot slipped off the brake pedal and hit the accelerator, according to EJFR Chief Bret Black. (Steve Mullensky/for Peninsula Daily News)
Addison Bell, 9, tries to drum up business for her lemonade stand at Fourth and Race streets in Port Angeles. The youngster said she had taken in about $70 before running out of product. She said a portion of the proceeds were slated to go to the Olympic Peninsula Humane Society with some set aside for herself. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News)

Open for business

Addison Bell, 9, tries to drum up business for her lemonade stand at Fourth and Race streets in Port Angeles. The youngster said she had… Continue reading

Addison Bell, 9, tries to drum up business for her lemonade stand at Fourth and Race streets in Port Angeles. The youngster said she had taken in about $70 before running out of product. She said a portion of the proceeds were slated to go to the Olympic Peninsula Humane Society with some set aside for herself. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News)
Active crew members rescue loggerhead sea turtles that had become tangled in fishing gear during their 58-day counternarcotics patrol.

Coast Guard cutter Active returns to Port Angeles

Crew back from 58-day patrol that included counternarcotics

Active crew members rescue loggerhead sea turtles that had become tangled in fishing gear during their 58-day counternarcotics patrol.
A mural by Craig Robinson in downtown Sequim represents a new partnership between Olympic Angels and Habitat for Humanity of Clallam County. Executive director Morgan Hanna with Olympic Angels, left, said they seek volunteers and mentors to help foster families. Colleen Robinson, chief executive officer for Habitat, said people are welcome to take photos on the wall of Habitat’s Boutique Store and they’ll place a sandwich board sign with information outside, and provide pamphlets about Olympic Angels during business hours. (Matthew Nash/Olympic Peninsula News Group)
A mural by Craig Robinson in downtown Sequim represents a new partnership between Olympic Angels and Habitat for Humanity of Clallam County. Executive director Morgan Hanna with Olympic Angels, left, said they seek volunteers and mentors to help foster families. Colleen Robinson, chief executive officer for Habitat, said people are welcome to take photos on the wall of Habitat’s Boutique Store and they’ll place a sandwich board sign with information outside, and provide pamphlets about Olympic Angels during business hours. (Matthew Nash/Olympic Peninsula News Group)
Jefferson County Public Works employee Monte Reinders, center, project manager Samantha Harper and county commissioner Greg Brotherton stand above the percolation pond for the new Port Hadlock sewer treatment facility that will be built along Loperman Road in Port Hadlock. The pond will treat, at its maximum, 700,000 gallons of treated wastewater per day. By the time the wastewater is treated and sent to this pond, it will be classified as class A reclaimed water, the highest category. The groundbreaking was held on Tuesday evening with about 35 guests on hand for the groundbreaking. (Steve Mullensky/for Peninsula Daily News)
Jefferson County Public Works employee Monte Reinders, center, project manager Samantha Harper and county commissioner Greg Brotherton stand above the percolation pond for the new Port Hadlock sewer treatment facility that will be built along Loperman Road in Port Hadlock. The pond will treat, at its maximum, 700,000 gallons of treated wastewater per day. By the time the wastewater is treated and sent to this pond, it will be classified as class A reclaimed water, the highest category. The groundbreaking was held on Tuesday evening with about 35 guests on hand for the groundbreaking. (Steve Mullensky/for Peninsula Daily News)
A line of Canada geese floats past family members, from left, Maisie Christison, 8, Apollo Christison, 3, grandmother Elizabeth Keitel of Wallace, Idaho, and mother Megan Christison of Port Angeles, on a warm day on Ediz Hook in Port Angeles. The group was enjoying cooler temperatures near the water. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News)

Just passing through

A line of Canada geese floats past family members, from left, Maisie Christison, 8, Apollo Christison, 3, grandmother Elizabeth Keitel of Wallace, Idaho, and mother… Continue reading

A line of Canada geese floats past family members, from left, Maisie Christison, 8, Apollo Christison, 3, grandmother Elizabeth Keitel of Wallace, Idaho, and mother Megan Christison of Port Angeles, on a warm day on Ediz Hook in Port Angeles. The group was enjoying cooler temperatures near the water. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News)
Demolition began Monday morning on the derelict two-story brick building at 204 E. Front St. in Port Angeles. A 300-foot section of Front Street will be shut down while the work is being done, and that could stretch into next week. The developer has said he has plans for an apartment building on the site. (Dave Logan/for Peninsula Daily News)

Building demolition

Demolition began Monday morning on the derelict two-story brick building at 204 E. Front St. in Port Angeles. A 300-foot section of Front Street will… Continue reading

Demolition began Monday morning on the derelict two-story brick building at 204 E. Front St. in Port Angeles. A 300-foot section of Front Street will be shut down while the work is being done, and that could stretch into next week. The developer has said he has plans for an apartment building on the site. (Dave Logan/for Peninsula Daily News)