COLLEGE BASKETBALL: ‘Flopping’ being cracked down on in new rules

PORT ANGELES — When fans come to a Peninsula College game next Saturday, they’re going to notice a few changes.

To the rules, that is.

Basically, college basketball is trying to get fakery out of the game. Fans might see a few more technical fouls until players adjust.

The NCAA has changed a number of rules this season and several of those changes are being tried out at the community college level.

The biggest change is referees have been instructed to crack down on “flopping,” i.e., falling down at the slightest amount of contact and trying to draw a charge on the other team.

Flopping will be considered a delay of game. The first time a player flops, it will be a warming. The second time a referee sees something he considers flopping, it will be a technical foul and free throws for the other team.

Even a shooter can be called for flopping, or faking contact. If a shooter falls down backwards after a shot when a defender runs by him, that could be considered trying to fake contact and a warning or technical foul may be issued.

“It will be interesting to see how it works out. Some people love [the changes] and some people hate it,” said Peninsula head coach Donald Rollman.

Rollman said some referees came in and worked with the team to show the players what will be considered flopping this year. In addition to the changes in flopping, Rollman said the referees have been instructed to crack down on shooters kicking their legs out when they shoot, which creates contact with defenders.

One thing referees will be looking at is whether a defender’s head snaps back before there’s any actual contact with an offensive player.

Another change is the shot clock will go back to 20 seconds rather than 30 after an offensive rebound to speed up the game.

Rollman does not expect the shot clock change to have a dramatic effect.

“We’re aware of it. It won’t be a big issue,” Rollman said.

These changes are just in the men’s game for now as the women’s rules remain the same.

Rollman said another change that might be coming next year is the 3-point line may be moved back. The NCAA has moved the 3-point line from 20 feet, 9 inches to 22 feet, 1¾ inches — moving it back 16¾ inches. The line in the NBA is 23 feet, 9 inches, except in the corners, where it is 22 feet.

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