Student medical assistant Christina Wommack of Port Angeles practices her phlebotomy skills on an artificial arm Thursday in a clinical lab seminar classroom in the newly constructed Allied Health & Early Childhood Education Building on the Port Angeles campus of Peninsula College. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News)

Student medical assistant Christina Wommack of Port Angeles practices her phlebotomy skills on an artificial arm Thursday in a clinical lab seminar classroom in the newly constructed Allied Health & Early Childhood Education Building on the Port Angeles campus of Peninsula College. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News)

Peninsula College to celebrate grand opening of new building on Monday

PORT ANGELES — Peninsula College will celebrate the grand opening of its new $25.6 million Allied Health and Early Childhood Education Building, located on the Port Angeles main campus at 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., at 2 p.m. Monday.

The public is invited to join students and the Peninsula College Board of Trustees for a brief ceremony in the new building, followed by light refreshments and the opportunity to view the new facility.

“The learning environment in our new Allied Health and Early Childhood Development Building mirrors the learning environment and features ‘sticky spaces’ to promote engagement with our busy, commuter students,” Kari Desser, PC spokeswoman, said in an email.

Open for spring

The Allied Health portion and Early Childhood Education classroom were open for spring quarter classes, which began March 30.

The Early Childcare Center is complete and will be open for the fall quarter.

PC President Luke Robins, board Chair Julie McCulloch, Trustee Michael Maxwell, Trustee Mike Glenn, Olympic Medical Center CEO Eric Lewis, state Rep. Mike Chapman and former PC Educare Center Director Joy Sheedy will speak during the grand opening.

Peninsula College’s Allied Health and Early Childhood Education programs educate and serve nearly 300 students and families each year.

The new building should support and enhance PC’s continued growth, Desser said.

The $25.6 million building features state-of-the-art smart classrooms and clinical lab spaces.

Community lab

The building’s Community Demand Lab is a flexible space that can accommodate rotational instructional programs to meet community demand, such as massage therapy, physical therapy, pharmacy tech and radiology tech.

The building also houses the Early Childhood Development programs and the Childcare Center.

“The quality, beauty and practicality of the childcare classrooms and outdoor playground provide a plethora of opportunities for children to explore, discover and learn,” Desser said.

The center is designed to serve up to 28 infants and toddlers and 40 preschoolers.

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Reporter Jesse Major can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 56250, or at [email protected] dailynews.com.

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