Barb Brabant, Welfare For Animals Guild (WAG) president, cuddles with Casey, an estimated 18-month-old Great Dane with severe injuries, at the WAG Half Way Home Ranch in Sequim. (Michael Dashiell/Olympic Peninsula News Group)

Barb Brabant, Welfare For Animals Guild (WAG) president, cuddles with Casey, an estimated 18-month-old Great Dane with severe injuries, at the WAG Half Way Home Ranch in Sequim. (Michael Dashiell/Olympic Peninsula News Group)

New life: Peninsula family adopts Casey the Great Dane

Dog had been found in February with gunshot wound to head

SEQUIM — Casey, a Great Dane rescued from the West End in February after being discovered lost and suffering from a gunshot wound to the head, now has a “forever home.”

Volunteers from the Welfare for Animals Guild reported last month that Casey left the Halfway Home Ranch with a family on the Olympic Peninsula which has lots of room for him to run, along with a companion dog.

“We want to thank everyone, the wonderful community, for their tremendous support,” WAG president Barb Brabant said.

“It is amazing to see such an outpouring of love.”

Casey the Great Dane is welcomed by his new family after being adopted earlier this spring. (Welfare for Animals Guild)

Casey the Great Dane is welcomed by his new family after being adopted earlier this spring. (Welfare for Animals Guild)

Casey was found in the woods near Beaver Lake with gunshot wounds that somehow passed through his head but fractured his jaw, leaving him unable to eat. He was emaciated when found, and WAG was called for help.

WAG Ranch Manager Mel Marshall rushed him to Pacific Northwest Veterinary Hospital, where Dr. Linda Allen began lifesaving procedures. It was unknown whether Casey would survive the night, WAG representatives said, but he came through and began his journey to healing at the WAG Halfway Home Ranch, located on McComb Road in Sequim.

Casey began to gain weight with feedings every two hours and had constant care from WAG volunteers and staff.

When he had gained 12 pounds, he returned to Allen for surgery to repair his shattered jaw. Then he was able to eat denser, more nutrient-rich food and gain more weight and strength, and he took walks around the ranch.

The community responded to Casey’s story with an outpouring of donations and love, WAG representatives said. A GoFundMe account received thousands of dollars, they added.

An auction at Sonny Spaw with gifts from Sequim merchants raised $3,000 for his benefit.

Casey posed for artists at Studio Bob in Port Angeles and later passed “The Home Depot” test, calmly walking through the busy store with the noise and commotion, demonstrating his readiness for placement in a new home, WAG representatives said.

In late May, Casey’s new family reported that he is doing great: “This weekend he had his first bath and a road trip that went so well,” they said.

“He has really relaxed into our environment here, and he and [our other dog] are doing great together.”

For more information about Casey and Welfare for Animals Guild, visit wagsequimwa.com.

More in News

Wind returns for Day 3 of Race to Alaska

Teams pushing north along Vancouver Island

Port Townsend pool on track to open in July

Task force favors Chimacum Park for replacement

‘Positive support’ shown for Recompete grant

Port of PA extends lease with Homeland Security

Jason Minnoch, left, and Jim deBord move a set of musical chimes as Al Oman and Jo Johnston look on during preparations on Wednesday for Sunday’s playground opening of the Dream Playground at Erickson Playfield in Port Angeles. The playground, rebuilt by volunteers in May after much of it was destroyed by arson in December, will host an official reopening and dedication ceremony at 3 p.m. Sunday. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News)
Reopening ceremony Sunday

Jason Minnoch, left, and Jim deBord move a set of musical chimes… Continue reading

Port Townsend, YMCA sued over 2022 pool ban

Confrontation with transgender employee at center of lawsuit

More muscle than wind in Phase 2 of Race to Alaska

Winds die down, force sailors to alternate with human power

Chris Fidler.
Port Angeles man honored with Distinguished Alumni award

Chris Fidler of Port Angeles has received the Distinguished Alumni… Continue reading

Members of the Makah Tribe bring a gray whale to shore on May 18, 1999. A federal ruling Thursday will allow the tribe to take 25 whales in a 10-year period. (Peninsula Daily News file)
Makah Tribe granted waiver to hunt gray whales

Ruling to allow tribe 25 in 10-year period

Team Roscoe Pickle Train of Port Townsend, which includes Chris Iruz, Enzo Dougherty, Odin Smith and Pearl Smith, were first out of the Victoria Inner Harbour at the start of the Race to Alaska on Tuesday. The cannon fired at noon and 38 racers headed to Ketchikan, a 750-mile contest that started in Port Townsend on Sunday. (Steve Mullensky/for Peninsula Daily News)
Racers restart in Victoria on their way to Alaska

One rescued by Coast Guard; two others try wheeling over land

Sequim city council members approved a $2.45 million purchase of 16.52 acres off West Hendrickson Road to be used for a future park. It remains closed to the public as it’s being leased for agricultural use until plans and funding can be put in place for the future park. (Matthew Nash/Olympic Peninsula News Group)
Sequim purchases 16 acres for park

City negotiated with McCord family for 2 years

Clallam sheriff pursuing $9.6M grant for public safety facility

Defense program geared to supporting military installations