Valarie Howard, second from right, a certified nursing assistant at Swedish First Hill, makes picket signs in Seattle on Monday, Jan. 27, 2020, as they plan to strike Tuesday. Nurses and caregivers from Swedish hospital have notified the hospital that they will strike for three days at all of the medical center’s locations in the Seattle region. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times via AP)

Valarie Howard, second from right, a certified nursing assistant at Swedish First Hill, makes picket signs in Seattle on Monday, Jan. 27, 2020, as they plan to strike Tuesday. Nurses and caregivers from Swedish hospital have notified the hospital that they will strike for three days at all of the medical center’s locations in the Seattle region. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times via AP)

Hospital strike by Seattle nurses, staff closes emergency rooms

Swedish Medical Center picketed

  • By Gene Johnson The Associated Press
  • Wednesday, January 29, 2020 1:30am
  • News

SEATTLE — Thousands of nurses and other employees at a Seattle hospital system began a three-day strike over staffing levels and wages Tuesday, forcing administrators to close two emergency departments and bring in replacement workers.

The picketers took to the sidewalks in front of Swedish Medical Center campuses wearing clear plastic ponchos against a heavy morning rain and carrying purple signs that read “Patients Before Profits” and “United For Our Patients.”

Swedish closed two of its seven emergency services departments — at its campuses in Seattle’s Ballard neighborhood and in Redmond — beginning at 7 p.m. Monday and said they would remain closed during the strike.

Susan Walker, a nurse in the day surgery department, joined dozens of others picketing outside the Ballard hospital. She said this was her first strike in 41 years as a nurse, but chronic short-staffing means she has to work on her day off every two or three weeks.

“We have to come in on our days off constantly to take care of patients,” Walker said. “It’s very disruptive to your life, but you feel sorry for your coworkers so you bite the bullet and come in.”

SEIU Local 1199NW represents 7,800 nurses, other caregivers and staff, and the union said its members voted overwhelmingly in favor of the three-day action.

Dr. Guy Hudson, chief executive of Swedish Health Services, said in a statement he was disappointed in the strike and that the administration had offered a strong wage and benefits package. That includes proposed raises totaling 11.25 percent over four years.

“Safe patient care is our number one priority,” Hudson said. “As it has for 110 years, Swedish will continue to provide high-quality, compassionate care to patients and their families, even during the strike.”

Swedish Medical Center nurses and other workers picket outside the hospital’s campus in the Ballard neighborhood of Seattle as they began a three-day strike Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2020, over staffing levels, wages and other issues. The hospital system closed two of its seven emergency departments and brought in replacement workers in response to the strike. (AP Photo/Gene Johnson)

Swedish Medical Center nurses and other workers picket outside the hospital’s campus in the Ballard neighborhood of Seattle as they began a three-day strike Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2020, over staffing levels, wages and other issues. The hospital system closed two of its seven emergency departments and brought in replacement workers in response to the strike. (AP Photo/Gene Johnson)

Both the Ballard and Redmond campuses have 18-bed emergency rooms, according to Swedish’s website.

The hospital is advising patients who might need emergency or urgent care services in Ballard or Redmond to go to one of its other facilities, including its emergency departments at Seattle’s First Hill and Cherry Hill campuses. The hospital network also has emergency departments at its hospitals in Issaquah, Edmonds and Mill Creek in Everett.

Labor and delivery services at the Ballard campus were also closed.

Kale Rose, a labor and delivery nurse and a member of the union’s negotiating team, said she herself had given birth there, which made her concerns about staffing all the more poignant.

In an emergency, she said, there needs to be enough “eyes and hands” present to accomplish required tasks, such as hanging IV bags, administering medication, weighing blood-soaked sponges to determine blood loss and transferring a patient if necessary.

“I know all of the scary things that can happen when you have a baby,” Rose said. “And I know what it’s like to be on staff and feel like you don’t have enough people to take care of patients.”

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