Darryl Wolfe is selected permanent CEO for OMC

Darryl Wolfe

Darryl Wolfe

PORT ANGELES — Darryl Wolfe, interim Chief Executive Officer of Olympic Medical Center, has been selected as the hospital’s permanent CEO.

Hospital commissioners selected Wolfe at a special board meeting on Wednesday and are expected to confirm his appointment in their regular board meeting at 12:30 p.m. this coming Wednesday.

Wolfe was named incoming interim CEO in January and has served in the role since June 2 after former CEO Eric Lewis left to work as the new chief financial officer for the Washington State Hospital Association.

As CEO, Wolfe will oversee a $221 million operations budget and nearly 1,600 employees, said Bobby Beeman, marketing and communications director.

The CEO earns between $210,000 and $235,000 annually with an incentive plan of up to 15 percent, Jennifer Burkhardt, human resources director-general counsel, said in June.

During Wednesday’s meeting, commissioners considered two candidates: Wolfe and an unnamed external applicant, Beeman said.

“This was a highly competitive and robust selection process,” Burkhardt said. “Darryl excelled in his interim role and will serve our patients, community and staff very well during these challenging times.”

A national search had drawn 91 applicants. Of those, 15 went through a screening process and eight candidates were formally interviewed via Skype, resulting in three finalists being asked to participate in all-day interviews on site. Two of those finalists were from out of state.

A human resources committee consisting of Commissioners Tom Oblak, John Nutter and Thom Hightower worked with hospital leadership and the remaining board members to determine the finalists.

The finalists were interviewed by a panel of board members, medical staff, community partners, stakeholders, the administrative leadership team, directors and staff, Beeman said.

Wolfe joined OMC in 2006 as a financial analyst, and progressed into leadership roles, including treasurer, director of administration, chief financial officer and most recently chief operating officer.

He holds a master’s degree in business administration from Pacific Lutheran University and a bachelor’s degree from Washington State University.

He lives in Port Angeles with his wife and two school-aged children.

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