Boeing continues production shutdown due to coronavirus

A worker walks near a mural of a Boeing 747-8 airplane at the company’s manufacturing facility in Everett in this March 23 file photo. In an email to Washington employees on Sunday, the company said it is extending a planned two-week shutdown rather than reopening Wednesday due to coronavirus concerns. The decision affects about 30,000 of Boeing’s 70,000 employees in the state. Employees are receiving their regular salaries during the two-week shutdown but will have to transition to vacation or sick leave after that. (Ted S. Warren/The Associated Press)

A worker walks near a mural of a Boeing 747-8 airplane at the company’s manufacturing facility in Everett in this March 23 file photo. In an email to Washington employees on Sunday, the company said it is extending a planned two-week shutdown rather than reopening Wednesday due to coronavirus concerns. The decision affects about 30,000 of Boeing’s 70,000 employees in the state. Employees are receiving their regular salaries during the two-week shutdown but will have to transition to vacation or sick leave after that. (Ted S. Warren/The Associated Press)

SEATTLE — Boeing will continue its shutdown of production indefinitely at its Seattle-area facilities due to the spread of the coronavirus.

The company said in a Sunday email to Washington employees it is extending the planned two-week shutdown rather than reopening today.

The decision affects about 30,000 of Boeing’s 70,000 employees in the state.

The company said the decision is based on the health and safety of its employees, assessment of the coronavirus spread, supply-chain concerns and recommendations from government health officials.

“The health and safety of our employees, their families and our communities is our shared priority,” said Boeing Commercial Airplanes CEO Stan Deal. “We will take this time to continue to listen to our incredible team, and assess applicable government direction, the spread of the coronavirus in the community, and the reliability of our suppliers to ensure we are ready for a safe and orderly return to operations.”

A spokesman told The Seattle Times that employees are receiving their regular salaries during the two-week shutdown but will have to transition to vacation or sick leave after that.

The company said at the end of the day Friday, it had 133 confirmed cases among employees worldwide, up from 118 a day earlier. Of those, 95 employees are in Washington.

Washington state had 7,666 confirmed cases of the virus and 322 deaths, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally on Sunday afternoon.

The coronavirus mainly is spread through coughs and sneezes. For most people, it causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough, that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia and death.

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