Medical personnel wait for a driver to pull up at a drive-through COVID-19 testing station for University of Washington Medicine patients Tuesday, March 17, 2020, in Seattle. The appointment-only drive-through clinic began a day earlier. Health authorities in Washington reported more COVID-19 deaths in the state that has been hardest hit by the outbreak. (Elaine Thompson/The Associated Press)

Medical personnel wait for a driver to pull up at a drive-through COVID-19 testing station for University of Washington Medicine patients Tuesday, March 17, 2020, in Seattle. The appointment-only drive-through clinic began a day earlier. Health authorities in Washington reported more COVID-19 deaths in the state that has been hardest hit by the outbreak. (Elaine Thompson/The Associated Press)

Washington state COVID-19 deaths up to 67

Gov. Inslee issues eviction ban

By Rachael La Corte and Martha Bellisle | The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — Washington state health officials reported 13 new deaths from the coronavirus on Wednesday, bringing the state tally of fatalities to 67 — the highest in the nation.

Also, Gov. Jay Inslee announced a 30-day statewide moratorium on evictions of tenants as the state continues to grapple with containing the spread of COVID-19 and the impact it is having on the state’s economy as businesses are forced to temporarily close and employees are laid off.

He also called on all public utilities in the state to suspend disconnections for nonpayment during the crisis, to waive late fees for customers who are out of work or offering customers payment plans and to expand bill assistance programs for customers impacted by coronavirus.

Ten of the newly announced deaths were in King County and five were associated with the Life Care Center, a nursing home in Kirkland. To date, 35 of the state’s death were linked to that facility. Clark County also reported a death Wednesday — the county’s third. Pierce county reported its first fatality from the disease and Snohomish County has reported six deaths.

For most people, the new coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia. The vast majority of people recover from the new virus.

Inslee’s move to help people facing housing issues came as the Federal Housing Finance Agency directed Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to suspend foreclosures and evictions for at least 60 days due to the outbreak.

The state moratorium was among several policies announced Wednesday that are intended to offer relief to businesses and their employees as the number of coronavirus cases topped 1,100.

For workers who have been laid off after the statewide order that closed restaurants, bars, gyms and other facilities through at least the end of the Month, Inslee announced a waiver of the one week waiting period to receive unemployment insurance.

The order is retroactive for claims filed up to March 8, the day of the governor’s first emergency rule expanding unemployment insurance criteria to cover more workers impacted by the coronavirus outbreak.

The governor is still seeking a major disaster declaration in the state so that residents otherwise not eligible for unemployment insurance could get help under the Disaster Unemployment Assistance program.

Up to $5 million will be made available as micro-grants to small businesses across the state to help prevent permanent closure.

The measures were announced hours after the Employment Security Department released its monthly unemployment rate update, showing that the rate for February was 3.8 percent.

In a written statement, Paul Turek, economist for the department, said that hiring in the state was strong last month, but noted that the numbers reflected a time before the current concerns and actions in response to COVID-19.

“Our record low unemployment rate is unlikely to last, however, as the economic impacts from containment efforts become more clear,” he said.

The Department of Revenue will have authority to waive suspend penalties and interest on certain late tax payments.

The state will create payment plans on the core amount businesses owe without filing tax liens in federal courts. This also means the suspension of enforcement actions such as forced collections by seizing bank accounts. These measures would be in force for at least 30 days.

These measures waive late filing fees for property tax exemption renewals; business license renewal late fees; and excise tax interest on B&O, real estate sales, and other taxes the department administers, including interest related to tax preferences for biotechnology and medical device manufacturing.

All of these tax-related measures are retroactive to Feb. 29, the date the governor initially declared a state of emergency.

Other changes announced Wednesday:

• The state Department of Social and Health Services will expand eligibility for cash assistance from the Family Emergency Assistance Program to include families without children. • Inslee called on all public utilities in the state to suspend disconnections for nonpayment during the crisis, to waive late fees for customers who are out of work or offering customers payment plans and to expand bill assistance programs for customers impacted by coronavirus.

• Restrictions on hours worked for delivery drivers carrying groceries, medical supplies and equipment, pharmaceuticals, fuel and pet food and supplies are being waived in order to ensure delivery of goods in a timely fashion.

Drivers must have a current safety rating of “satisfactory” and cannot extend their hours if they feel fatigued, ill, or have been on duty for more than the allowed number of consecutive hours.

• Suspension of rules around nursing home assessment requirements to allow for faster admissions and suspending long term care inspections and surveys on particular timelines except in specific circumstances.

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