The Quilcene School District bus barn would be torn down and a new one built on the opposite side of Rose Street, if the Quilcene community agrees to pass the district’s capital levy that is on the Feb. 11 ballot. (Quilcene School District)

The Quilcene School District bus barn would be torn down and a new one built on the opposite side of Rose Street, if the Quilcene community agrees to pass the district’s capital levy that is on the Feb. 11 ballot. (Quilcene School District)

Quilcene School District asking for capital levy

The district will have two proposed on February ballot

QUILCENE — The Quilcene School District will place two levies on the Feb. 11 special election ballot asking voters to approve funds for school services and begin to prepare a plan for a possible bond to replace the elementary school building.

Proposition 1 would replace the current Education Programs and Operations (EPO) levy at the same rate of $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed property value, said Superintendent Frank Redmon.

“Even though the state said we could ask for more, we feel like we want to keep that rate down because we believe we can continue to operate our school at the same level and deliver the same service our community expects with the money they already agreed to,” Redmon said.

“So we just want to keep the EPO levy constant and just replace what we’re doing.”

The Quilcene School District bus barn would be torn down and a new one built on the opposite side of Rose Street, if the Quilcene community agrees to pass the district’s capital levy that is on the Feb. 11 ballot. (Quilcene School District)

The Quilcene School District bus barn would be torn down and a new one built on the opposite side of Rose Street, if the Quilcene community agrees to pass the district’s capital levy that is on the Feb. 11 ballot. (Quilcene School District)

Proposition 2 is a proposed capital levy of $1.97 per $1,000 assessed value, which would be in place for two years for a total of $1.63 million in preparation for a possible bond proposal, Redmon said.

Both measures would need only a simple majority to pass.

The school board approved placing the two on the ballot Nov. 18.

The capital levy would be used to fix facility issues, such as replacing the “aging and unfixable” bus barn, moving the barn to across Rose Street and moving the student bus pick-up and drop-off to the same side of the street as the school — so students no longer have to cross the street to get to and from the busses — and updating the parent drop-off area to make it more “efficient for the parents and safer for the students,” Redmon said.

In addition to the facility repairs, the capital levy would also help “engage our community in a more robust and deeper conversation about how to address our significant issues with the elementary school and the middle school,” Redmon said.

The tentative plan for the district is after the capital levy expires is to present a bond proposal to voters to raise funds to replace the two buildings, Redmon said.

As envisioned now, the bond, if passed, would cost the same as the capital levy at $1.97 per $1,000 assessed value, for a total of approximately $11 million, Redmon said.

During a public meeting on Sept. 16, Redmon estimated the bond would be be paid off in 30 years. However nothing is set in stone, he said, and the district would conduct more concrete planning and community outreach before the plan was finalized through the help of the capital levy, Redmon said.

The issues with the elementary school were revealed as part of a study and survey begun in 2018 and which is still underway. The study is conducted every six years.

It has revealed several deficiencies within the building. It isn’t seismically sound and has a poor electrical system and insulation, among other issues, Redmon said at the meeting.

The middle school building is not in immediate need of replacement, but it will be in the next 10 to 20 years, said Redmon at the meeting.

The current high school is older than both the elementary and middle school, being built in 1938. But it was built differently than the other buildings and is in good condition, needing only minor code updates, Redmon said.

______

Jefferson County reporter Zach Jablonski can be reached at 360-385-2335, ext. 5, or at zjablonski@peninsuladailynews.com.

More in News

Air Force to clean up station

EPA plans to oversee Neah Bay operation

Appraisal for Short’s Farm less than port expected

Port of PT considering purchase to support local agriculture growth

Artwork by Sixkiller, contemporary Cherokee artist, is on display in House of Learning, Peninsula College Longhouse now through March.
Cherokee artist to speak on Grandma Spider

Contemporary Cherokee artist Karen Sixkiller will speak on “Rediscovering… Continue reading

Jefferson PUD plans to standardize broadband fees

Some internet providers in Jefferson County may see their… Continue reading

Port Angeles Community Award recipients gather after Saturday night’s fifth annual awards gala, including, from left, Joe DeScala, representing 4PA, organization of the year; Dr. Gerald Stephanz, citizen of the year; Tommy Harris, young leader of the year; Natalie Snow, Katelyn Sheldon and Andrea Dean, representing Welly’s Real Fruit Ice Cream, emerging business of the year; and Hayley Sharpe, owner of MOSS, business of the year. Not present was John Gallagher, educator of the year. The awards are produced by the Port Angeles Chamber of Commerce and sponsored by Sound Publishing. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News)
Community awards distributed at chamber gala

Six categories featured as event returns in person

One hurt in wreck at 104-Shine intersection

A Poulsbo woman was treated and discharged from Harborview Medical… Continue reading

Brock Tejeda, a high school senior, fits together his carefully crafted pieces of wood to make a step stool just like the larger finished sample on the left. Port Angeles High School hosted a Skills USA Olympic Regional contest in the woodshop at the school on Saturday. The contest involved students making in eight hours from precise directions a small step stool using their skills and the shop’s many tools and machines. Joe Shideler is the woodshop teacher, but retired woodshop teacher Tim Branham was the enabler who brought the contest back to the school after a four-year COVID absence. There were five high school contestants including one girl. Skills USA sponsors over 50 skills across the country. PAHS participated in the carpentry and precision machinery areas. (Dave Logan/for Peninsula Daily News)
Skills contest

Brock Tejeda, a high school senior, fits together his carefully crafted pieces… Continue reading

Matthew Nash/Olympic Peninsula News Group
About 100 people gathered in support of Sequim School District's proposed CTE building at Sequim City Council's last meeting. More than 20 people spoke in favor of the project in a public hearing.
Sequim council approves $250K for CTE facility

City’s contribution part of effort to raise $1 million

Monroe Athletic Field
Bidding opens for Monroe Athletic Field

Slated for completion this fall

Most Read