The Quilcene School District bus barn would be torn down and a new one built on the opposite side of Rose Street, if the Quilcene community agrees to pass the district’s capital levy that is on the Feb. 11 ballot. (Quilcene School District)

The Quilcene School District bus barn would be torn down and a new one built on the opposite side of Rose Street, if the Quilcene community agrees to pass the district’s capital levy that is on the Feb. 11 ballot. (Quilcene School District)

Quilcene School District asking for capital levy

The district will have two proposed on February ballot

QUILCENE — The Quilcene School District will place two levies on the Feb. 11 special election ballot asking voters to approve funds for school services and begin to prepare a plan for a possible bond to replace the elementary school building.

Proposition 1 would replace the current Education Programs and Operations (EPO) levy at the same rate of $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed property value, said Superintendent Frank Redmon.

“Even though the state said we could ask for more, we feel like we want to keep that rate down because we believe we can continue to operate our school at the same level and deliver the same service our community expects with the money they already agreed to,” Redmon said.

“So we just want to keep the EPO levy constant and just replace what we’re doing.”

The Quilcene School District bus barn would be torn down and a new one built on the opposite side of Rose Street, if the Quilcene community agrees to pass the district’s capital levy that is on the Feb. 11 ballot. (Quilcene School District)

The Quilcene School District bus barn would be torn down and a new one built on the opposite side of Rose Street, if the Quilcene community agrees to pass the district’s capital levy that is on the Feb. 11 ballot. (Quilcene School District)

Proposition 2 is a proposed capital levy of $1.97 per $1,000 assessed value, which would be in place for two years for a total of $1.63 million in preparation for a possible bond proposal, Redmon said.

Both measures would need only a simple majority to pass.

The school board approved placing the two on the ballot Nov. 18.

The capital levy would be used to fix facility issues, such as replacing the “aging and unfixable” bus barn, moving the barn to across Rose Street and moving the student bus pick-up and drop-off to the same side of the street as the school — so students no longer have to cross the street to get to and from the busses — and updating the parent drop-off area to make it more “efficient for the parents and safer for the students,” Redmon said.

In addition to the facility repairs, the capital levy would also help “engage our community in a more robust and deeper conversation about how to address our significant issues with the elementary school and the middle school,” Redmon said.

The tentative plan for the district is after the capital levy expires is to present a bond proposal to voters to raise funds to replace the two buildings, Redmon said.

As envisioned now, the bond, if passed, would cost the same as the capital levy at $1.97 per $1,000 assessed value, for a total of approximately $11 million, Redmon said.

During a public meeting on Sept. 16, Redmon estimated the bond would be be paid off in 30 years. However nothing is set in stone, he said, and the district would conduct more concrete planning and community outreach before the plan was finalized through the help of the capital levy, Redmon said.

The issues with the elementary school were revealed as part of a study and survey begun in 2018 and which is still underway. The study is conducted every six years.

It has revealed several deficiencies within the building. It isn’t seismically sound and has a poor electrical system and insulation, among other issues, Redmon said at the meeting.

The middle school building is not in immediate need of replacement, but it will be in the next 10 to 20 years, said Redmon at the meeting.

The current high school is older than both the elementary and middle school, being built in 1938. But it was built differently than the other buildings and is in good condition, needing only minor code updates, Redmon said.

______

Jefferson County reporter Zach Jablonski can be reached at 360-385-2335, ext. 5, or at [email protected].

More in News

Volunteers sought for hospice support

Assured Hospice of Clallam and Jefferson Counties is seeking… Continue reading

West End scholarships

The West End Youth and Community Club has awarded $250… Continue reading

Volunteers sought for meal delivery

Olympic Community Action Programs’ Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP)… Continue reading

Jefferson Healthcare relaunches nurse consult line for COVID-19 symptoms

Case numbers increasing in both Peninsula counties

Grant to expand behavioral health services

NOHN gets $3,3 million for project

Transit examines future plans

More routes, connections considered

Northwest Maritime Center Executive Director Jake Beattie acknowledged the past 16 months' trials during the Navigator Night Out. Diane Urbani de la Paz/Peninsula Daily News
Maritime Center event highlights teens’ successes

Students get involved in solo sail, boat project, jobs program

Weekly flight operations scheduled

There will be field carrier landing practice operations for aircraft… Continue reading

<strong>Photos by Keith Thorpe</strong>/Peninsula Daily News
Top: Kathryn Kudron of Port Angeles parades with Gavin, a great dane, during judging Saturday at Carrie Blake Park in Sequim. Above: Michael Bryant of Everett brushes the coat of G.G., a Havanese, prior to entering the show ring at the Hurricane Ridge Kennel Club’s All-Breed Show and Agility Trials. The event, which continues today at 
8 a.m., brought in hundreds of dogs from across the region for the American Kennel Club-sanctioned show.
Dog show

Michael Bryant of Everett brushes the coat of G.G., a Havanese, prior… Continue reading

Most Read