Left, Jessica Dowe, an Olympic Peninsula Humane Society staff member, holds OPHS resident Lulu. Above, Port Angeles resident Karen Dopheide and her son Maxwell are pictured with Athena, whom they adopted from OPHS. Staff said that though Athena was loved by each volunteer and staff member at the shelter she had to be an only animal in the house and so she kept getting passed Over. Athena spent six years at the humane society before being adopted by Dopheide. Photos courtesy of Olympic Peninsula Humane Society

Left, Jessica Dowe, an Olympic Peninsula Humane Society staff member, holds OPHS resident Lulu. Above, Port Angeles resident Karen Dopheide and her son Maxwell are pictured with Athena, whom they adopted from OPHS. Staff said that though Athena was loved by each volunteer and staff member at the shelter she had to be an only animal in the house and so she kept getting passed Over. Athena spent six years at the humane society before being adopted by Dopheide. Photos courtesy of Olympic Peninsula Humane Society

Olympic Peninsula Humane Society reopens by appointment

PORT ANGELES — The Olympic Peninsula Humane Society is once again open to adopting its furry clientele — but by appointment only.

The humane society had shut down for three weeks before reopening April 9.

“We don’t want these animals to have to remain in the shelter for any longer than necessary,” said Brad Evans, shelter manager at the Olympic Peninsula Humane Society (OPHS).

“The dogs and cats we take in need to be part of someone’s family, not shelter wards, he said.

“We reopened adoptions again so the animals do not have to linger here during the pandemic. OPHS should always be looked at as temporary shelter to move dogs and cats into their forever homes as quickly as possible.”

Olympic Peninsula Humane Society reopens by appointment

Luanne Hinkle, OPHS executive director, said the organization typically has a steady stream of visitors coming into the shelter, which necessitated a full closure in March.

“We have been very proactive in taking all the necessary precautions revolving around COVID-19, including closing to the public early on,” she said.

“Like human health care workers, our direct animal care staff members are essential, she added.

“And because some were quarantined due to potential exposure to an ill family member or (who) had mild flu-like symptoms themselves, the rest of our dedicated staff has been pulling double duty.”

Those interested in adoptions are required to submit an application for a specific animal found on the organization’s Petfinder listings; applications are then reviewed by staff for appropriate fits.

Hinkle said OPHS has a number of procedures to assure the pet adoption process is safe including special isolation rooms exclusively for adopter/animal meet and greets. Rooms are sterilized after each visitation, Paperwork is processed prior to appointments online.

Additionally, she noted, the humane society enforces strict socialization practices of masks-wearing for both staff and adopters.

“During these difficult isolation times, adopting an animal is a great way to bring comfort and joy into your life, Evans said.

“With everyone home, this also allows an animal to acclimate to new surroundings nicely with constant companionship.”

Left, Jessica Dowe, an Olympic Peninsula Humane Society staff member, holds OPHS resident Lulu. Above, Port Angeles resident Karen Dopheide and her son Maxwell are pictured with Athena, whom they adopted from OPHS. Staff said that though Athena was loved by each volunteer and staff member at the shelter she had to be an only animal in the house and so she kept getting passed Over. Athena spent six years at the humane society before being adopted by Dopheide. Photos courtesy of Olympic Peninsula Humane Society

Left, Jessica Dowe, an Olympic Peninsula Humane Society staff member, holds OPHS resident Lulu. Above, Port Angeles resident Karen Dopheide and her son Maxwell are pictured with Athena, whom they adopted from OPHS. Staff said that though Athena was loved by each volunteer and staff member at the shelter she had to be an only animal in the house and so she kept getting passed Over. Athena spent six years at the humane society before being adopted by Dopheide. Photos courtesy of Olympic Peninsula Humane Society

The organization has received an “overwhelming” number of foster applications during the novel coronavirus pandemic.

“We have placed quite a few animals into foster homes, and we are now pivoting to adoptions again,” the organization noted on its Facebook page.

See www.ophumane society.org/adoption- information for dogs and cats available for adoption.

OPHS’s major annual fundraiser, “Meowgaritas and Mutts,” was scheduled to take place later this month (April 25), but it’s been postponed to Oct. 17, staff said.

To help OPHS with needed funding, visit www.op humanesociety.org/donate.

Kenny Abrams, a Olympic Peninsula Humane Society staff member, holds OPHS resident Lulu. Photo courtesy of Olympic Peninsula Humane Society

Kenny Abrams, a Olympic Peninsula Humane Society staff member, holds OPHS resident Lulu. Photo courtesy of Olympic Peninsula Humane Society

For more than 70 years, the Olympic Peninsula Humane Society has maintained an active presence in the communities of

For more information, call 360-457-8206 or visit www.ophumanesociety.org.

Jessica Dowe, a Olympic Peninsula Humane Society staff member, holds OPHS resident Lulu. Photo courtesy of Olympic Peninsula Humane Society

Jessica Dowe, a Olympic Peninsula Humane Society staff member, holds OPHS resident Lulu. Photo courtesy of Olympic Peninsula Humane Society

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