Northwest Colonial Festival continues through Sunday

SEQUIM — The Northwest Colonial Festival will offer a Colonial Village and re-enactments of important Revolutionary War battles and other activities through Sunday.

The festival, which began Thursday at the George Washington Inn and Washington Lavender Farm at 939 Finn Hall Road just west of Sequim, aims to show what life was like in colonial times and re-enact the events of April 19, 1775, when the American Revolutionary War began.

Each day, the “Skirmish on Lexington Green” will be reenacted at 10:30 a.m. and the “Battle for Concord Bridge” at 2:30 p.m.

Dozens of re-enactors will portray historical figures such as George and Martha Washington and British redcoats.

Tickets are $15 per adult with discounts for active duty military and their spouses, seniors, teens and children. Children 2 and younger will be admitted free.

Each ticket is good for the whole weekend with the event running daily from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. through Sunday.

Throughout the event, visitors can see period-appropriate colonial dancing, listen in on historical discussions, see sword fights, hear the Columbia Fife & Drum Corps and participate in traditional teas daily at 1:30 p.m. (individual tickets for this event cost $37 and are available through www.colonial festival.com).

The Northwest Colonial Festival will feature food from Jeremiah’s BBQ, Aloha Smoothies and the farm’s snack shop with lavender lemonade and ice cream.

The program can be downloaded from the website or picked up at the event.

More information can also be found at facebook.com/colonialfestival.

Tickets and more information are available at colonialfestival.wordpress.com/press.

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