Paddlers, from left, Jennie Freese, Casey Fall and Eric Hoffman, all of Port Angeles, make their way across the mostly empty waters of Port Angeles Harbor in this April 16, 2020, file photo. All outdoor recreation involving fewer than five people outside one’s household is expected to open June 1 based on Gov. Jay Inslee’s current four-phase plan for reopening Washington. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News file)

Paddlers, from left, Jennie Freese, Casey Fall and Eric Hoffman, all of Port Angeles, make their way across the mostly empty waters of Port Angeles Harbor in this April 16, 2020, file photo. All outdoor recreation involving fewer than five people outside one’s household is expected to open June 1 based on Gov. Jay Inslee’s current four-phase plan for reopening Washington. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News file)

AT A GLANCE: When things in Washington might reopen

We break down Gov. Inslee’s 4-phase plan

Update, Wednesday, May 13: As of Friday, May 8, all the industry sectors listed in Phase 1 of Gov. Jay Inslee’s four-phase plan for reopening the state will now be able to resume in some form under new safety guidelines. As of Monday, May 11, the following counties were approved for advancement to Phase 2: Columbia, Ferry, Garfield, Lincoln, Pend Oreille, Skamania, Stevens and Wahkiakum.

Gov. Jay Inslee on Friday announced that Washington’s stay-home order to curb the coronavirus spread has been extended through May 31.

Inslee also unveiled a four-phase plan that state officials will adhere to as they try to navigate the reopening of businesses in Washington.

Inslee said that each phase will run for a minimum of three weeks to give officials time to evaluate whether it’s safe to move to the next level. Phase 1 begins May 5.

Inslee said that it’s possible the four-phase timeline could be accelerated if “we catch some massive break because of climatic conditions or because a cure is found.”

But, “We can’t count on that,” Inslee said.

The governor also has released a list of 10 counties that are eligible to apply for reopening into Phase 2 earlier than is scheduled for other counties.

Jefferson County is on the list, along with Grays Harbor.

Clallam County is not on the list because it it has had new cases in the past three weeks.

Other counties on the list are Columbia, Garfield, Lincoln, Pend Oreille, Skamania, Wahkiakum, Kittitas and Ferry.

Based on the governor’s rough timetable, here’s the best-case scenario of when we can expect various attractions and amenities to reopen.

 


 

Phase 1 (expected to begin May 5)

What’s allowed:

• Some outdoor recreation (hunting, fishing, golf, boating, hiking). Note that camping is still not allowed, and state campsites remain closed.

• “Drive-in” spiritual services with one household per vehicle

• Only essential travel

Essential businesses

• Existing construction that meets agreed-upon criteria

• Landscaping

• Car sales

• Retail (curbside pickup only)

• Car washes

• Pet walkers

 


 

Phase 2 (earliest expected date based on current data trends is June 1)

What will be allowed:

• All outdoor recreation involving fewer than five people outside one’s household. Camping and beaches are expected to reopen.

• Gatherings with no more than five people outside your household

• Limited nonessential travel within proximity of home

• All remaining manufacturing businesses

• New construction

• In home/domestic services such as nannies, house cleaning

• Retail (in-store purchases allowed with some restrictions)

• Real estate

• Office-based businesses; telework remains strongly encouraged

• Barbers, hair and nail salons

• Restaurants (must operate at under 50 percent capacity, with table sizes capped at parties of five)

 


 

Phase 3 (earliest expected date based on current data trends is June 22)

What will be allowed:

• Outdoor group recreational sports activities, capped at groups of 50 people

• Recreational facilities such as public pools, operating at less than 50 percent capacity

• All gatherings capped at 50 people

• Nonessential travel can resume

• Restaurants can operate at up to 75 percent capacity, with table sizes capped at parties of 10

• Bars at under 25 percent capacity

• Indoor gyms at under 50 percent capacity

• Movie theaters at under 50 percent capacity

• Government offices open; telework remains strongly encouraged

• Libraries

• Museums

• All other businesses other than nightclubs and events with more than 50 people

 


 

Phase 4 (earliest expected date based on current data trends is July 13)

What will be allowed:

• Public interactions will be allowed to resume, though physical distancing should still be observed

• All recreational activity can resume

• Gatherings of more than 50 people can resume

• Nightclubs

• Concert venues

• Large sporting events

Social distancing and good hygiene habits must continue.

Safe Start Washington: A Ph… by Laura Foster on Scribd

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