Aurora Faase adjusts the skirt on “Jellyfish,” her piece for the Student Wearable Art Show this Saturday. (Diane Urbani de la Paz/for Peninsula Daily News)                                Aurora Faase adjusts the skirt on “Jellyfish,” her piece for the Student Wearable Art Show this Saturday. (Diane Urbani de la Paz/for Peninsula Daily News)

Aurora Faase adjusts the skirt on “Jellyfish,” her piece for the Student Wearable Art Show this Saturday. (Diane Urbani de la Paz/for Peninsula Daily News) Aurora Faase adjusts the skirt on “Jellyfish,” her piece for the Student Wearable Art Show this Saturday. (Diane Urbani de la Paz/for Peninsula Daily News)

‘Absolutely amazing’: Student Wearable Art Show set in Port Townsend

Theme of Saturday benefit is ‘Salish Sea Meets Climate Destruction’

PORT TOWNSEND — “Extinction Rebellion.” “Crabby.” “Jellyfish.” T-shirts, giant jars and a red bodysuit. Such will be the sights at the Student Wearable Art Show, the annual event about to spill across the stage at the Key City Playhouse this coming Saturday.

“I just came from visiting a student who entered with a drawing of her piece that wasn’t very detailed,” artist and mentor Margie McDonald said last week.

She went in wondering how 18-year-old Natalie Grant’s show entry was progressing. Turns out “it’s practically built and it’s fantastic,” McDonald said.

“I couldn’t pick my jaw up off the floor fast enough.”

Ephraim Lewis paints the top of his piece for Saturday’s Student Wearable Art Show in Port Townsend. (Diane Urbani de la Paz/for Peninsula Daily News)

Ephraim Lewis paints the top of his piece for Saturday’s Student Wearable Art Show in Port Townsend. (Diane Urbani de la Paz/for Peninsula Daily News)

Grant’s piece is the aforementioned “Extinction Rebellion,” a full-length wearable sculpture she’s worked on for months. It’ll appear along with about a dozen other wearable art creations in two performances, at 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. at the playhouse, 419 Washington St. The 3 p.m. show will culminate in the awarding of cash prizes: $100 for first place, $50 for second and $25 for third.

Admission is $10 for adults and free for students, while advance tickets are available at www.keycitypublictheatre.org and 360-385-5278. Proceeds from the event — like its older sibling the Port Townsend Wearable Art Show on May 9 — benefit the Jefferson County Fund for Women and Girls. For information about the fund’s local work, see www.JCFGives.org, and for more about both wearable art shows, visit www.PTWearableArt.com.

The student show’s theme doesn’t shy away from reality: it’s “Salish Sea Meets Climate Destruction.” The young artists are constructing ocean creatures out of recycled materials and upcycled fabrics, ranging from curtains to bubble wrap.

“It’s controlled chaos. The kids just build stuff,” said Michele Soderstrom, art teacher at Port Townsend High School. Thanks to PT Artscape, a consortium funded by a Washington State Arts Commission grant, McDonald comes to her classroom to help students realize their artistic visions. On a recent morning Ephraim Lewis, 14, painted an umbrella-size pink hat inspired by those worn in the rice paddies of Asia while Rell Lennox, 15, supervised. She’ll model the yet-to-be-titled sculpture in Saturday’s show.

‘Absolutely amazing’: Student Wearable Art Show set in Port Townsend

Nearby Aurora Faase, Claudia Wilcox, both 15, and Vicky Rincon, 14, fashioned the buoyant headdress of a walking “Jellyfish,” while Natalie Zavalza and Danielle Lukin, both 14, arranged the eyes on “Crabby.” McDonald talked with 14-year-old Mckaide Fowler about design elements and how he might make a three-dimensional cloth dolphin.

A creation for the Student Wearable Art Show “goes on your résumé. You’ve built something. It’s public performance. It’s collaborative,” said McDonald. She works with a team of artist mentors called SWATCH: Student Wearable Art Technical Creative Helpers, at Port Townsend High School and Quilcene School. Some of the young artists enter their pieces in the May show, and over its 10 years there have been students who, competing with professional artists, won its top prizes.

Grant’s wearable art piece is her senior project; after graduation she plans to go to the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding in Port Hadlock.

As for the unveiling of her work and that of her fellow students, “I already know it’s going to be absolutely amazing. You will be blown away by the creativity of a whole bunch of kids.”

More in Entertainment

A construction crew works on the glass face of the new Field Arts & Events Hall on Thursday near the Port Angeles waterfront. The hall is expected to be put on hold when the exterior is complete pending additional fundraising to finish the approximately $50 million project, which will include a 1,000-square-foot art gallery, 500-seat performance hall, 300-seat conference area and a coffee shop. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News)
Glass installed on events hall in Port Angeles

Glass installed on events hall in Port Angeles A construction crew works… Continue reading

Vivian Elvis Hansen, marketing representative for the Peninsula Daily News, center, accepts a check for the Peninsula Home Fund from Jim’s Pharmacy chief financial officer Anna Shields, left, and Jim’s owner, Joe Cammick, on Tuesday in Port Angeles. The Home Fund received $885.65 as the pharmacy’s charity of the month. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News)
Jim’s Pharmacy donates to Home Fund

Jim’s Pharmacy donates to Home Fund Vivian Elvis Hansen, marketing representative for… Continue reading

Peninsula College instructor to offer free improv workshop

A weekly improvisational theater workshop is set to begin tonight, free and… Continue reading

Clallam County public libraries have expanded curbside service hours.
North Olympic Library System to expand curbside service hours

Public libraries in Port Angeles, Sequim, Forks and Clallam… Continue reading

Photos of the first 16 weeks of pandemic lockdown in Port Angeles  will be the topic of a lecture by photographer Amy McIntyre, executive director of the North Olympic History Center. (Amy McIntyre/ North Olympic History Center)
North Olympic History Center to present free lecture series

The North Olympic History Center, formerly the Clallam County… Continue reading

Twenty-two portraits of dogs are part of a display for the Read to Rover program. (Kim Pratt)
Portraits of dogs in Chimacum reading program on display

Artist learned to paint for the project

Haida-Tlingit artist Robert Davidson is the subject of "Haida Modern," the first selection in the year-round PTFF Pics series. Photo by Tina Schliessler
New series to feature film, interviews with directors

New series begins with ‘Haida Modern’

ronald thom
Future of oceans topic of lecture

Ronald Thom will present “What Eelgrass and Other Marine… Continue reading

Necklace over bronze sculpture is by Katie Jablonski.
Abstracts, jewelry, portraits exhibited by Port Ludlow Art League

The Port Ludlow Art League presents this month exhibits… Continue reading

Native plant webinars set

The Clallam Conservation District will host two free webinars… Continue reading

Logan Laxson and Mia Underwood move their Sequim Acrobatics rehearsals outdoors, using the Dungeness Railroad Bridge as a stage for a Dec. 19 photo shoot. Submitted photo
Holiday performance on pause

After delays, Sequim Acrobatics team looks to perform in January

Vocal Masters instructor Elaine Gardner-Morales, also a bass player, has created an online Peninsula College course for singers to explore jazz, country and pop music.   (Philip D. Lusk/For Peninsula Daily News)
Vocalists still singing online despite it all

Vocal Masters Series class welcomes students, guest coaches