Brooke Taylor, chair of the Port Angeles Waterfront Center, announced the nonprofit has partnered with the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe on Wednesday. (Jesse Major/Peninsula Daily News)​

Brooke Taylor, chair of the Port Angeles Waterfront Center, announced the nonprofit has partnered with the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe on Wednesday. (Jesse Major/Peninsula Daily News)​

Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe to be partner in Port Angeles arts center

PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Waterfront Center has partnered with the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, allowing the proposed performing arts center to combine local culture, science and arts, board chairman Brooke Taylor has announced.

Taylor told attendees at the Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce luncheon Wednesday that the board asked the tribe if it wanted to have a presence on the 1.6-acre property and “the response was quick and positive.”

The $15 million to $20 million center, planned for the dormant Oak Street property downtown, is made possible by a pair of donations.

The late Donna M. Morris of Port Angeles left $9 million to the Peninsula College Foundation to develop the performing arts center. That gift was followed by a $1.43 million donation from Port Angeles resident Dorothy Field for the purchase of the parcel at the northwest corner of Front and Oak streets.

Officials announced in March that the Feiro Marine Life Center would also be part of the campus.

Michael Peters, the tribe’s CEO, said that though the tribe doesn’t know exactly what the partnership will look like yet, it’s excited to be part of the project.

“We’re in the process of sharing ideas as we develop what that partnership might be,” he said. “We’re bouncing ideas internally. We’ve thrown around a lot of ideas from designs, programs, to actually assisting in the construction.”

He said the goal would be to highlight the Elwha tribe, as well as other Olympic Peninsula tribes.

Peters hoped to have a more solid idea of what the partnership means in the coming months, he said.

Taylor said the tribe’s proposed downtown Port Angeles hotel would work perfectly with the vision for the performing arts center.

The plan, he said, is to also have space for conferences and meetings in an effort to make the Port Angeles Waterfront Center self-sustaining.

“We are really excited about the possibilities,” he said.

The performance hall, which Taylor said would seat about 300 people, would double as an area for keynote speakers.

A marketing analyst in Seattle determined that 300 seats likely would be a good number of seats, enough to prevent events from over-selling or under-selling, Taylor said.

“If we had a venue below 300 seats, we’d have difficulty bringing in outside acts,” he said. “If we go too large, it would be undersold most of the time.”

It was determined based on demographics and statistics that there are likely between 18,000 and 22,000 people locally who would attend performances, he said.

Taylor called the millions who travel to Olympic National Park every year an “untapped market.”

Peters said that in designing the hotel, the tribe is trying to complement the Port Angeles Waterfront Center, not compete with it.

“We’re real excited to be a part of that project,” he said. “We think it’s a bigger venture beyond what they are doing in helping change the face of the downtown area.”

________

Reporter Jesse Major can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 56250, or at jmajor@peninsuladailynews.com.

More in News

Health warning lifted at East Beach on Marrowstone Island

Jefferson County Public Health has lifted the health warning from… Continue reading

Abby Counts, 8, with assistance from her father, Taylor Counts, an EMT with Clallam 2 Fire-Rescue, gives a newly acquired tender truck a ceremonial wash down during a push-in ceremony on Saturday at the district’s Station 22. The truck, tender 22, cost $459,439 and was paid for by the fire district’s 2020 levy lid lift. Saturday’s ceremony also included a blessing by the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe and a “push-in” of the truck into its berth. The tender replaces a 31-year-old truck that had reached the end of its useful life. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News)
New tender

Abby Counts, 8, with assistance from her father, Taylor Counts, an EMT… Continue reading

The 95 Port Townsend High School seniors walk through the rhody garden at Fort Worden State Park on their way to the graduation ceremony on Friday. (Steve Mullensky/for Peninsula Daily News)
Graduation walk

Port Townsend, Chimacum ceremonies

Lands commissioner wary of federal plan to kill thousands of owls

Washington’s public lands commissioner, Hilary Franz, is voicing skepticism about a federal… Continue reading

Operations scheduled at Bentinck range this week

The land-based demolition range at Bentinck Island will be… Continue reading

Weekly flight operations scheduled

There will be field carrier landing practice operations for aircraft… Continue reading

Matt Larson of Sequim, who uses the radio call sign KC7EQO, tunes into a ham radio satellite during Saturday’s Radio Field Day at the Clallam County Fairgrounds in Port Angeles. The annual event, hosted by the Clallam County Amateur Radio Club, brought together amateur radio operators from around the world in a contest to make as many radio contacts as possible in a 24-hour period as a test of emergency preparedness from remote locations. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News)
Testing the system

Matt Larson of Sequim, who uses the radio call sign KC7EQO, tunes… Continue reading

Best of the Peninsula.
Voting round open for Best of Peninsula contest

It’s time again to vote for the Best of the Peninsula. Now… Continue reading

Port of Port Townsend focusing on five capital improvement projects

Stormwater improvement in permitting phase; construction may begin this year

Clallam County Sheriff Brian King, right, carries a ceremonial torch with Special Olympian William Sirguy, center, accompanied by his mother, Katie Sirguy, during Friday’s Special Olympics Law Enforcement Torch Run along the Waterfront Trail in Port Angeles. The event, designed to raise awareness and funds for the Special Olympics movement, brought together law enforcement officers from Clallam, Jefferson and Kitsap counties for a march across the North Olympic Peninsula. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News)
Torch run

Clallam County Sheriff Brian King, right, carries a ceremonial torch with Special… Continue reading

Groups back natural gas initiative

Signature-gathering efforts end July 5

Pictured left to right, Ginny Wagner, Xxzavyon (XJ) Square, Ewan Mordecai-Smith, Elise Sirguy, Mahayla Amendolare and Mallory Hartman cut the ribbon of the little free library at Jefferson Elementary School on Friday. (Darlene Cook)
Students come together to promote reading literacy

Free library constructed near Jefferson Elementary