Trump to Everett crowd: ‘We’re gonna win’

The Republican presidential candidate’s visit to Everett is marked by both supporters and protesters.

Marcyann Ritchie, of Snohomish holds her homemade sign supporting Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump as she waits in line Tuesday for a Trump rally in Everett. (Ted S. Warren/The Associated Press)

Marcyann Ritchie, of Snohomish holds her homemade sign supporting Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump as she waits in line Tuesday for a Trump rally in Everett. (Ted S. Warren/The Associated Press)

EVERETT — Donald Trump told thousands of supporters in Everett that he would win in Washington in November, which hasn’t voted for a Republican presidential candidate since Ronald Reagan in 1984.

“You know a Republican would never come to the state of Washington,” said Trump, who arrived for a rally and a fundraiser Tuesday evening.

“We’re gonna win it. That’s why I’m here.”

The New York businessman’s speech to cheering backers at Xfinity Arena was interrupted several times by protesters who were escorted out of the facility.

People started gathering outside the arena hours before the doors opened, with thousands lining up for several blocks.

Police presence

There was a large police presence in the area.

Protesters gathered near the facility but were outnumbered by Trump supporters.

An organized protest rally began Tuesday afternoon at Clark Park. Everett Mayor Ray Stephanson and other officials planned to attend before marching to the nearby arena.

Brandon Knox, 18, of Auburn arrived early in the morning to line up to see the candidate.

“I like Trump because he’s pro-gun and he wants to enforce immigration,” he told The Daily Herald.

Several prominent Washington state Republicans were staying away from the Trump event, having previously said they wouldn’t support their party’s nominee.

GOP Senate candidate Chris Vance, gubernatorial candidate Bill Bryant and Rep. Dave Reichert, who represents the state’s 8th Congressional District, have all said they won’t vote for Trump because of his controversial statements.

Trump last visited the state in May, when he held rallies in Spokane and Lynden.

A recent Elway Poll showed Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton with a double-digit lead over Trump in Washington — 43 percent to 24 percent.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump shakes hands as he arrives to a campaign rally at Xfinity Arena of Everett on Tuesday in Everett. (Evan Vucci/The Associated Press)

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump shakes hands as he arrives to a campaign rally at Xfinity Arena of Everett on Tuesday in Everett. (Evan Vucci/The Associated Press)

Protesters line a barricade outside a rally for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump on Tuesday in Everett. (Ted S. Warren/The Associated Press)

Protesters line a barricade outside a rally for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump on Tuesday in Everett. (Ted S. Warren/The Associated Press)

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump arrives to a campaign rally at Xfinity Arena. (Evan Vucci/The Associated Press)

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump arrives to a campaign rally at Xfinity Arena. (Evan Vucci/The Associated Press)

Seattle police officers stand watch near protesters outside a rally for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump in Everett. (Ted S. Warren/The Associated Press)

Seattle police officers stand watch near protesters outside a rally for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump in Everett. (Ted S. Warren/The Associated Press)

Supporters of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump wait in line for a rally Tuesday in Everett. (Ted S. Warren/The Associated Press)

Supporters of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump wait in line for a rally Tuesday in Everett. (Ted S. Warren/The Associated Press)

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