Danny Milholland, a local activist with the Jefferson County Stand with Standing Rock group, participates in an event last weekend to benefit the Dakota Access Pipeline protesters in North Dakota. (Jen Lee Light)

Danny Milholland, a local activist with the Jefferson County Stand with Standing Rock group, participates in an event last weekend to benefit the Dakota Access Pipeline protesters in North Dakota. (Jen Lee Light)

Standing Rock protest, benefit variety show planned in Port Townsend this weekend

PORT TOWNSEND — Local activists have organized two more events this weekend to raise money and awareness for protesters rallying against the Dakota Access Pipeline on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota.

Last Saturday, more than 100 people marched down Water Street in Port Townsend to show their support for the protesters and to protest the pipeline themselves.

The proposed pipeline would transfer oil from North Dakota’s Bakken region through South Dakota and Iowa into Illinois. The $3.7 billion pipeline would move 470,000 barrels of domestic crude oil a day.

Protesters say the pipeline endangers the environment and sacred land.

This Saturday, local activists Doug and Danny Milholland are organizing two events to raise money and to protest the pipeline.

Doug Milholland, the leader of the Jefferson County Stand with Standing Rock group, is planning a protest from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday outside of the Wells Fargo branch at the corner of Kearney Street and East Sims Way in Port Townsend.

“Nothing happens in the United States without social, political or economic pressure,” Doug Milholland said. “The goal here is economic pressure.”

Milholland said he is encouraging people to take their money out of Wells Fargo at least until Wells Fargo changes its investments. Wells Fargo is one of 17 institutions that have invested in the Dakota Access Pipeline, he said.

“The goal is to catch the attention of these bankers,” Milholland said. “We hope to make it clear that we want them to be looking into and investing in renewable energy.”

Milholland’s son, Danny Milholland, is planning a show of support as well.

Shortly after his father’s protest, Danny Milholland will host a Standing Rock Benefit Variety Show at the Palindrome, 1893 S. Jacob Miller Road, just outside of Port Townsend.

Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and a $20 to $50 donation is suggested at the door. But Danny Milholland said that no one would be turned away and that donations of any size are welcome.

The proceeds of the event will go to the Iktce Wichasa Oyate, or “Common Man Society,” which functions as the camp security team for the protesters at the Oceti Sakowin Camp in North Dakota — the camp that hosts the Seven Nations Council Fire.

“We have an awesome cast of musicians and performers and tribal members who will be performing,” Danny Milholland said.

The evening’s entertainment will include performers such as Nanda, a martial arts and circus performing group from Port Townsend; Sunny Francis, a musician and member of the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe; and Walter McQuillen, a performer from the Makah Tribe.

According to Danny Milholland, all of the performers will be donating their time for the night.

“We’re just excited for the community support we’ve already seen for these events,” he said.

There have been a number of events planned by activists from the Jefferson County Stand with Standing Rock group in the past few weeks.

Last weekend’s fundraiser at the Highway 20 Roadhouse raised $1,500, according to event organizer and local activist Carmen Bitzer.

Bitzer said $400 of the money raised will go to Seattle physician Hailey Wilson, a Nez Perce tribal member, to send her to Standing Rock.

The rest will sponsor a bus to take area activists to the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota to protest the pipeline along with thousands of other activists and tribal members from across the United States.

More information on the Pacific Northwest Stands with Standing Rock movement can be found at www.pnwstandswithstandingrock.org.

________

Jefferson County Editor/Reporter Cydney McFarland can be reached at 360-385-2335, ext. 55052, or at cmcfarland@peninsuladailynews.com.

Doug Milholland, a local activist with the Jefferson County Stand with Standing Rock group, participates in an event last weekend to benefit the Dakota Access Pipeline protesters in North Dakota. (Jen Lee Light)

Doug Milholland, a local activist with the Jefferson County Stand with Standing Rock group, participates in an event last weekend to benefit the Dakota Access Pipeline protesters in North Dakota. (Jen Lee Light)

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