NEWS BRIEFS: Port Angeles School Board releases agenda for today’s meeting … and other items

PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles School Board will elect officers for the new year when it meets today.

The board will meet in regular session at 7 p.m. at Franklin Elementary School, 2505 S. Washington St. An executive session to consider personnel, to consult with legal counsel, to discuss collective bargaining or to consider real estate is planned at 6 p.m.

In addition to electing a president and vice president, the board will consider approval of the code of ethics, operating principles for the board and a strategic plan contract.

It also will consider a policy on public access to district records and approval of pro and con committees to write statements for the voter pamphlet on a proposed levy that will be on the Feb. 14 special election ballot.

The proposed levy would replace an existing levy that will expire at the end of 2017. It would authorize collection of property taxes to provide $9.1 million each year from 2018 through 2021.

Students set to ‘pursue justice’ in PT

PORT TOWNSEND — High school students from Clallam, Jefferson and Kitsap counties will meet at the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson St., as part of WSU/4-H’s “Know Your Government” program Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Under the theme “Pursuing Justice,” teenagers in ninth through 12th grades are invited to this training about the government’s judicial branch.

The training is a prerequisite for taking part in 4-H’s broader Know Your Government program, which culminates in a four-day, statewide conference in Olympia from Feb. 18 to 21.

During the training, students will become familiar with different kinds of court cases, state courts and their jurisdictions, the trial process, resolving conflicts and mock trial roles.

Registration is required. In Clallam, contact Jenny Schmidt, county 4-H coordinator, at 360-417-2398 or jenny.schmidt@wsu.edu.

In Jefferson, contact Tanya Barnett, county 4-H coordinator, at 360-379-5610, ext. 208, or tanya.barnett@wsu.edu.

For more information about Know Your Government, visit http://extension.wsu.edu/4h/youth/kyg.

Smoothies talk planned for Dec. 15

PORT TOWNSEND — Daniella Chace, a local clinical nutritionist, educator and author, will present in the Port Townsend Public Library’s Pink House, 1220 Lawrence St., at 6 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 15.

Chace will give a free talk on her new book, “Breast Cancer Smoothies”; breast cancer toxins; and nutrients in smoothies that target breast cancer, according to a news release.

For more information, contact Melody Sky Eisler, library director, at meisler@cityofpt.us or 360-344-3054, or visit http://ptpubliclibrary.org.

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