Michael Dashiell / Olympic Peninsula News Group file
Myron Teterud, a longtime Sequim schools and community supporter, gives the crowd a salute after being honored as “Fan of the Century” at Sequim High School’s centennial celebration in January 2011. Sequim School Board directors agreed to name the SHS athletic field in honor of Teterud, along with naming the stadium <strong>stáʔčəŋ</strong>, a S’Klallam word meaning “wolf.”

Michael Dashiell / Olympic Peninsula News Group file Myron Teterud, a longtime Sequim schools and community supporter, gives the crowd a salute after being honored as “Fan of the Century” at Sequim High School’s centennial celebration in January 2011. Sequim School Board directors agreed to name the SHS athletic field in honor of Teterud, along with naming the stadium stáʔčəŋ, a S’Klallam word meaning “wolf.”

Names OK’d for Sequim stadium, field

Tribe, Teterud honored at athletic facility

SEQUIM — Sequim athletes and fans will enjoy games in a newly named stadium and field this coming fall, after school leaders agreed to honor the ancestral lands the facility rests and a revered Sequim High School sports fan.

Following the recommendation of a committee assigned to consider facility names, Sequim School Board directors on Monday approved the changing of the names of the district stadium on West Fir Street to stáʔčəŋ, a S’Klallam word pronounced “stah-chung” and meaning “wolf,” and the field to Myron Teterud’s Field, after the longtime, late SHS sports fanatic.

The committee included seven members: Dustin Brenske, Jamestown S’Klallam deputy director of Social and Community Services; Jessica Humphries, Jamestown S’Klallam Youth and Teen program coordinator; Sequim Alumni Association President Lorri Gilchrist; Judy Reandeau Stipe, Sequim Museum & Arts executive director; Sequim High School principal Shawn Langston; SHS Athletic Director Craig Brooks; and Joan Zook, Sequim School District’s interim superintendent.

“We have a historic opportunity,” Stipe said Monday evening, prior to the vote.

“I am overwhelmingly excited; all the people we’ve told love the idea of stáʔčəŋ Stadium; we’re excited to be part of this.”

The committee met twice — April 28 and May 6 — and the proposal that came out of those meetings had overwhelming and unanimous support and enthusiasm, Zook said.

“I’m very excited that this was the outcome,” said Eric Pickens, Sequim School Board president.

“It speaks to the community about people coming together and listening, thoughtfully.

“I’m getting some goosebumps just talking about it.”

Teterud, who rooted for SHS athletics for the past six decades, died April 30, 2021, at 81. He had suffered a stroke in 2018.

For months prior to his death, Sequim Alumni Association members and other community members urged naming the athletic facility after Teterud.

Gilchrist, a Sequim High 1970 graduate, offered her organization’s thoughts in support of honoring Teterud, who attended almost every football, basketball, baseball game and track event; tickets, handed out programs, greeted fans, encouraged the band, and helped the cheerleaders get the crowd cheering “while always wearing purple and gold and his Letterman’s jacket.

“Fields and stadiums are typically named after Hall of Fame-type folks, which is great. But naming the field after Myron says something about our community, that we value our fans as much as we do our athletes,” she said.

“The players come and go, but Myron was there through decades, whether teams were winning league titles or losing every game of the season and everything in between.

“When people come across the field name and they ask, ‘Who was Myron? Why was he a big deal?,’ it’s an opportunity to talk about loyalty and sportsmanship and being true to your school, an unwavering support of all things Sequim.”

Langston said he appreciated the formal process the district constructed, as he and other staff had over the years received recommendations for naming portions of the schools facilities.

He said other districts have made similar dual naming processes, such as a school naming a gymnasium for an individual or entity, and that gym’s floor for another individual or entity.

“There was unanimous feeling that these were the recommendations they wanted to bring to the board for consideration,” she said.

In other action:

• School district representatives have named Desara Bibaj the Sequim School Board’s student representative for the junior class in 2022-2023.

Bibaj joins incoming senior student representative Calem Klinger on the board this fall.

Stoffer noted that directors will be having further discussions this summer about a process to accept advisory votes from students.

At the board’s June 6 meeting, Pickens said other districts across the state are forming similar policies to allow advisory votes from their students.

“There are some topics that are not appropriate for them to vote on, just as there may be some for individual members to not vote on,” he said.

Director Larry Jeffryes said the district should be very careful in how they set up policy that would allow for student advisory vote.

“I think once they got used to the idea that we’re going to ask them (for a vote) … it would work out fine,” he said. “We’ve had some good student reps; they’ve been amazingly insightful.”

Director Patrice Johnston concurred.

“[This policy] gives them a voice,” she said. “I think that’s important not only for them but the students they represent.”

• Wenaha Group project manager Chris Marfori updated the board on progress for the district’s capital projects, noting that fire alarms at the Helen Haller Elementary portables were scheduled to be installed in July.

Roof repair and recoating at Sequim Middle School and Olympic Peninsula Academy are slated to begin in July and August, but may carry over into the school year, he said.

Design work on the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems at Olympic Peninsula Academy and Sequim High School is scheduled to be in-process throughout the summer, Marfori said, with the goal of getting OPA’s system ready by the fall.

Sequim High School’s HVAC system will take much longer to design, Marfori said, because the system upgrade will affect virtually every building and will need to be staged.

“[Projects like this] are hard to do in just the summers,” he said.

________

Michael Dashiell is the editor of the Sequim Gazette of the Olympic Peninsula News Group, which also is composed of other Sound Publishing newspapers Peninsula Daily News and Forks Forum. Reach him at [email protected].

More in News

Agencies support Dash Air

Kenmore Air filed complaint to USDOT

Public comment on the purchase of 17 acres adjacent to Hoko River State Park is now open.
Purchase near Hoko River open for public comment

Seventeen acres near state park

Injured hiker rescued from Cape Johnson

The Coast Guard rescued an injured hiker from the beach… Continue reading

Three members of an orca family swim off the east shore of the National Wildlife Reserve on Protection Island near Port Townsend on Monday. Southern Resident orcas have only 74 members and are listed as an endangered species. (Steve Mullensky/for Peninsula Daily News)
Southern Residents spotted

Three members of an orca family swim off the east shore of… Continue reading

Applicants sought for project grants

The Ben and Myrtle Walkling Memorial Trust is currently… Continue reading

Matthew Nash/Olympic Peninsula News Group

Access from River Road to West Silberhorn Road was closed for several hours Monday after a cyclist died after being struck by a garbage truck.
Sequim man dies after he was hit by garbage truck

A Sequim man has died after he was struck by… Continue reading

Eleanor Stopps award nominations sought

Nominations for the 2022 Eleanor Stopps Environmental Leadership Award… Continue reading

COVID-19 case rates are trending downward

Health officers encourages vaccines before school starts

Most Read