Jeff Roy received the 2019 Mary P. Johnson Historic Preservation Award from the Jefferson County Historical Society for restoration of the 1865 Fowler House at 1040 Jefferson St. in Port Townsend. (Craig Britton)

Jeff Roy received the 2019 Mary P. Johnson Historic Preservation Award from the Jefferson County Historical Society for restoration of the 1865 Fowler House at 1040 Jefferson St. in Port Townsend. (Craig Britton)

Eleven given historic preservation awards

Two Port Townsend projects get Jefferson County Historical Society’s highest honor

PORT TOWNSEND — Two Port Townsend projects received the 2019 Mary P. Johnson Historic Preservation Award, the highest honor given by the Jefferson County Historical Society.

Kathleen Crosten and Penny Ridderbusch received the award for restoring the 1890 J.W. Griffiths House at 2030 Monroe St.

From 2014 to 2019 Crosten and Ridderbusch renovated and restored the home inside and out, using period-specific fixtures and window and wall treatments, the society said in a press release.

Jeff Roy also received the award for restoration of the 1865 Fowler House at 1040 Jefferson St.

The two-year project, from 2017 to 2019, involved moving the home onto a new foundation and the addition of a basement, remodeling the interior and restoring the structure’s exterior, the release said.

The historical society’s preservation awards, which have been presented annually since 1978, honor individuals and groups who have worked to preserve or restore traditions, stories or structures in Jefferson County. Structures can include residential, commercial, or public buildings.

This year the society received 11 nominations.

“I’m very pleased with all of the restoration projects that are underway here in Jefferson County and particularly in Port Townsend,” said Craig Britton, chair of the Historical Society Awards Committee.

“The committee visited the sites, all of which were meritorious, including two that were worthy of the prestigious Mary Johnson Award.”

Certificates of Merit go to nine projects this year:

• The Native Connections Action Group of Quimper Unitarian Universalist Fellowship and the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe for the čičməhán Trail Project.

The project involved extensive community collaboration to research and interpret the history of Chief čičməhán (1808-1888) of the S’Klallam people who lived in the Village of qatáy where present day Port Townsend now sits.

The project team designed and installed interpretive signage throughout Port Townsend, including 18 signs along three walking/biking/driving loops ranging from 3 to 12 miles long.

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, located 1020 Jefferson St. and built in 1862, received a Certificate of Merit from the Jefferson County Historical Society this year. (Craig Britton)

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, located 1020 Jefferson St. and built in 1862, received a Certificate of Merit from the Jefferson County Historical Society this year. (Craig Britton)

• The Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding at 42 N. Water St., Port Hadlock, for rehabilitation of two historic waterfront buildings, the Washington Co-op and the Grange Store, dating to 1938.

Both were repaired and restored to become offices and classrooms for the school.

• The 1862 St. Paul’s Episcopal Church at 1020 Jefferson St.

The front of the church was repainted, and steps and railings were replaced.

• The Port Townsend Public Library’s 1868 Pink House at 1256 Lawrence St., next to the Carnegie Library.

The stone wall in front of this public building was rebuilt using the original stones.

• Washington State Parks and Jefferson County Historical Society for the 1868 Rothschild House at 418 Taylor S.

The project involved exterior repairs to the gutters, shutters, windows, siding, porch rail and a completely repainted exterior.

• The Quilcene Cemetery Commission led by Laurie Neuenschwander.

The restoration of the cemetery, which contains burials that date to 1884, involved three years of community collaboration, including Eagle Scout participation, to restore headstones and create new metal markers for every burial.

• Norma Bishop, owner of the 1890 Captain Tibbals Daughter’s Cottage at 1234 Franklin St.

Bishop reworked the foundation, repaired siding, replaced the roof, remodeled the interior and repainted the cottage inside and out.

• Melissa Kehoe, owner of the 1908 Captain Slayton House at 440 Polk St.

Kehoe rebuilt the foundation and restored the original garage.

• Matthew and Rebecca Mahan, owners of the 1885 Steiner House at 1118 Lawrence St.

The Mahans restored the home’s siding, repaired windows, replaced the roof and painted the exterior.

Mary P. Johnson moved to Port Townsend in 1958 and spearheaded the burgeoning efforts to preserve and restore Port Townsend’s Victorian buildings.

The Historic Preservation Committee members in 2019 include Britton, Carleen Bruins, Laura Reutter, Myron Gauger and Margaret Mazurkiewicz.

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