Charlie Buckham, 6, rides a pony Saturday at the Jefferson County Fair. (Zach Jablonski/Peninsula Daily News)

Charlie Buckham, 6, rides a pony Saturday at the Jefferson County Fair. (Zach Jablonski/Peninsula Daily News)

Competitions wrap up today at Jefferson County Fair

PORT TOWNSEND — The Jefferson County fair gives members of the community and the surrounding area the opportunity to compete with each other in different ways throughout its three-day run.

Today is the last day for the fair, themed “Jammin’ Jungle.” Gates open at 8 a.m. for ticket sales and the fair opens at 10 a.m. at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds at 4907 Landes St.

Ticket prices are $8 for adults 18 to 64; $6 for seniors 65 and older and students form 13 to 17; and $2 for children 6 to 12. Children 5 and younger will be admitted free.

All active duty service members and their families will, with valid I.D., receive a $1 military discount. Payments can be made only by cash or check; an ATM will be located near the fair office.

There are many different competitions that people of all ages can enter in, such as produce, a variety of animal-showing competitions, horseback riding and other events.

This is the first year that Bev Smith, who moved to Jefferson County seven years ago, has entered her cats into the county fair, but she has attended the fair every year since she moved to the area seven years ago.

Smith was competing in the open class cat competition with three of her Savannahs (a hybrid breed created by crossing a domestic short hair with an African Serval). The open class allows anyone to enter, regardless if they have a 4-H affiliation or not.

The judging portion has the owners bring their cat to a judge, who checks their health, temperament and obedience in a variety of ways.

“You wait for your name to be called and then take the cat over to the judge,” Smith said. “And cross your fingers and hope [the cat] doesn’t end up in the rafters.”

Smith has her judging for her cats today, where they’re to be evaluated by a judge and a veterinarian.

Though it is her first year, Smith wants more people from the public to enter their cats.

“Bring them please, its a blast,” Smith said. “You get to entertain people, you get to teach people. What could be better?”

The horse riding competitions draws competitors from all across the state.

Janelle Witman from Blaine travels with her husband to over 10 different fairs a year, as he competes in the Horse Pull event. This is the third time she has been to the Jefferson County Fair and she still enjoys watching her husband compete in Port Townsend, she said.

Today is also the annual beef barbecue, which has become one of the staples of the fair. It begins at 11:30 a.m. and continues to 4 p.m. and costs an extra $8, in addition to fair admission. The meal includes the beef entree, baked beans, macaroni salad and rolls/french bread.

The annual Mud Drags start at 11 a.m. on the main stage.

Vendors, animal competitions, diet-killing fair food, games and entertainment are planned today.

The fair is open until 6 p.m. tonight. Then it will be another year before its back in full swing.

For information about specific entertainment guests, competitions and a complete schedule, go to www.jeffcofairgrounds.com/general-info.

________

Jefferson County reporter Zach Jablonski can be reached at 360-385-2335, ext. 5 or at [email protected].

Linda York works on her weaving at the Peninsula Weavers Guild and the Jefferson County Spinners booth at the Jefferson County Fair. (Zach Jablonski/Peninsula Daily News)

Linda York works on her weaving at the Peninsula Weavers Guild and the Jefferson County Spinners booth at the Jefferson County Fair. (Zach Jablonski/Peninsula Daily News)

4-H members compete in the the Poultry Fitting and Showing at Jefferson County Fair Saturday. From left are Owen Hatfield, 14; Donna Lukin, 13; Ike Banks, 14; and Claire Porter, 12. (Zach Jablonski/Peninsula Daily News)

4-H members compete in the the Poultry Fitting and Showing at Jefferson County Fair Saturday. From left are Owen Hatfield, 14; Donna Lukin, 13; Ike Banks, 14; and Claire Porter, 12. (Zach Jablonski/Peninsula Daily News)

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