Center Valley Animal Rescue Director Sara Penhallegon visits some of the older rescued Anatolian shepherds that are now up for adoption. (Cydney McFarland/Peninsula Daily News)

Center Valley Animal Rescue Director Sara Penhallegon visits some of the older rescued Anatolian shepherds that are now up for adoption. (Cydney McFarland/Peninsula Daily News)

Animals rescued from Gardiner property recovered and ready for adoption

QUILCENE — Dogs, chickens and goats found living in squalid conditions in Gardiner earlier this year and taken to area shelters have recovered and are up for adoption, according to Center Valley Animal Rescue and the Jefferson County Humane Society.

Center Valley, a no-kill shelter in Quilcene, received eight goats, 17 chickens and 11 Anatolian shepherds — seven puppies, two juveniles and two adults — after 41 animals, 17 of them dogs, were seized by the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office from a property in the 276000 block of U.S. Highway 101 in June.

The Jefferson County Humane Society of Port Townsend — which is not a no-kill shelter but doesn’t euthanize for space — took in eight dogs, which soon became 18, after one of the adults had a litter of 10 puppies.

“We didn’t know she was pregnant until a month later,” said Nicole Lewis, a staff member at the humane society. “So she actually had the puppies here.”

Paul Becker, president of the local humane society, in June identified the dogs — known as Anatolian shepherds, or kangals — as being rare in the United States.

The animals were found on a property owned by Nataliya Nivens. She entered into a contract with Jefferson County District Court in September in which she is banned from owning animals, other than a personal pet, for 24 months.

She also will be responsible for reimbursing the humane society and Center Valley Animal Rescue for the cost of housing the animals, according to Amanda Wilson, deputy prosecuting attorney.

All of the animals brought to Center Valley Animal Rescue are well now, Director Sara Penhallegon said.

“Everyone has made a full recovery,” Penhallegon said. “Some of the chickens will have permanent issues, like blindness, but they’re healthy.”

Seven of the dogs — six of them puppies — have been adopted from Center Valley. One of the juvenile dogs, which suffers from joint issues, has been adopted by a family on the East Coast, Penhallegon said.

A 6-month-old puppy, a year-old juvenile and both adults await adoption now.

All but one of the 10 puppies at the humane society have been spoken for, and the adult dogs have been adopted.

Of those taken by Center Valley, two juveniles had originally been taken to the humane society but were sent to the Quilcene shelter because they were having issues with fighting. Penhallegon said she and her staff are working to socialize those dogs so they can be adopted as well.

“The adult dogs will probably never be indoor dogs, but we’ve worked really hard with the young ones so they can be pets,” Penhallegon said.

They need families who will love them, she said.

“They’re great dogs,” Penhallegon said. “They just need someone who will understand them.”

When they came to the center, the seven puppies were starving and the adults suffered from fight wounds, she said.

The puppies had to be fed every two hours after they were rescued, and many required constant fluid drips, as well as a long list of medications, from pain relievers to antibiotics.

Anatolian shepherds are large dogs, bred to be herd protectors. Penhallegon said they make great pets and the younger dogs are very playful.

Also needing a lot of rehabilitation were the chickens, which were found caked with mud and feces.

That caused “mud scald” on their skin and injured their feet, Penhallegon said.

Many suffer from blindness due to the ammonia levels of their living area in Gardiner, she said.

Center Valley staff and volunteers cleaned the chickens and treated them for parasites, and they all are now healthy, Penhallegon said.

“They’re really friendly birds,” Penhallegon said. “Even the roosters get along with each other.”

Because a flock of 17 is a little much for one person to adopt, the center would be willing to split the chickens into three groups — each with one rooster.

“They are all very nice birds and the hens are good layers,” Penhallegon said.

The eight goats have now grown to 11 because of births. The goats were found skinny and full of parasites but are now healthy, she said.

Animals have been spayed or neutered, if appropriate, and treated for diseases. All of them are awaiting good homes, but Penhallegon said those who can’t adopt can help in other ways.

“We’re always looking for volunteers to come love on some animals,” Penhallegon said.

The Jefferson County Humane Society is open from noon to 5 p.m Tuesdays through Sundays at 112 Critter Lane in Port Townsend. A list of adoptable animals is available at www.hsjcwa.org. The phone number is 360-385-3292.

Center Valley Animal Rescue is open from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays at 11900 Center Road in Quilcene. Animals available for adoptions and other information is at www.centervalleyanimalrescue.org. The phone number is 360-765-0598.

________

Jefferson County Editor/Reporter Cydney McFarland can be reached at 360-385-2335, ext. 55052, or at cmcfarland@peninsuladailynews.com.

Goats rescued from Gardiner in June have made a full recovery and are looking for a good home. (Cydney McFarland/Peninsula Daily News)

Goats rescued from Gardiner in June have made a full recovery and are looking for a good home. (Cydney McFarland/Peninsula Daily News)

Chickens rescued from Gardiner will not recover entirely from their injuries, but all are happy, healthy and very friendly, according to Center Valley Animal Rescue. (Cydney McFarland/Peninsula Daily News)

Chickens rescued from Gardiner will not recover entirely from their injuries, but all are happy, healthy and very friendly, according to Center Valley Animal Rescue. (Cydney McFarland/Peninsula Daily News)

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