Bruce Tanner, left, and Tritten Ganiner, right, load a cider press with apples freshly picked from the Williams Manor orchard during Applestock 2018. (Olympic Peninsula News Group)

Bruce Tanner, left, and Tritten Ganiner, right, load a cider press with apples freshly picked from the Williams Manor orchard during Applestock 2018. (Olympic Peninsula News Group)

Applestock cider, music to celebrate autumn

Benefit event is supporting the Salvation Army this year

SEQUIM — Applestock returns to Sequim to ring in autumn, with the orchards at Williams Manor opening up once more to bring cider, live music and entertainment to the community.

This year, the benefit event is raising donations of canned goods and financial support for the Salvation Army.

“They’re a group that’s doing a lot of great work in Clallam County,” said Mark Schwartz, event organizer, and Williams Manor, host.

“Anything we can do to support what they do is a good thing in my book. We’ll collect Toys for Tots, socks, gloves, razors, non-perishable food and snacks for the Salvation Army food cupboard.”

The seventh annual benefit will run from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. today and from noon to 10 p.m. Saturday at the manor’s orchard, 4043 Sequim Dungeness Way. Admission is a canned food donation. Donations will be accepted between musical sets.

Additional parking is available at Dungeness Community Church, 45 Eberle Lane.

Volunteers will run several cider presses to pass out cider to attendees. The benefit also will feature live music both days, including the Bread & Gravy Duo, Malcolm Clark, the Free Rangers, the Simonson Sisters, Jonathan Simonson and his Band of Bones and the Ronnie G. Band.

The “Open Mic Allstars” from the Rainshadow Cafe will put on a performance Saturday night.

“We’re really excited to have all these bands that are important to the area,” Schwartz said. “And the open mic group is going to be a lot of fun.”

A ceremonial bonfire tonight will welcome international students attending Peninsula College this year.

The Williams Manor bed and breakfast is one of the original Dungeness homesteads and is home to an orchard of 30 apple trees, many of which date back to the early 1900s and grow rare varieties of apples.

Cider presses will be on-site for visitors to sample, or they bring a clean container to take some cider home.

For more information, contact Schwartz at 360-460-3763 or [email protected].

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