Ecological effects of wolf eradication to be discussed in Jan. 8 lecture

PORT ANGELES — The evidence of effects of wolf eradication on Olympic National Park’s river systems will be the topic of a lecture on Jan. 8.

The lecture is part of the park’s Perspectives Winter Speaker Series, which is offered free at 7 p.m. on the second Tuesday of each month. The talks are in the Raymond Carver Room of the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St.

Wolves, Elk, Rivers and Trophic Cascades in Olympic National Park” will be presented by Kurt Jenkins, PhD, wildlife biologist with the United States Geological Survey

This presentation explores evidence of possible ecological effects on the park’s riverine ecosystems as a result of wolf eradication nearly a century ago.

The series is sponsored by Olympic National Park, the Friends of Olympic National Park and the North Olympic Library System.

“We invite our neighbors and visitors to see Olympic National Park through new perspectives,” said Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum.

“Science, research and collaboration provide new windows on the park and are all featured in this year’s series.”

Future lectures are:

• Feb. 12 — The Edge of the Sea: Scales of Change on Olympic Coast Beaches, by Ian Miller, PhD, coastal hazard specialist with Washington Sea Grant.

Miller will discuss recent studies on Rialto and Kalaloch beaches and investigations of sea level change on the Olympic Coast.

• March 12 — Predators and Prey: Columbian Black-tailed Deer and Cougar Research on the Olympic Peninsula, by Kim Sager-Fradkin, wildlife biologist with the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe.

Sager-Fradkin will share the results of a four-year study examining patterns of fawn and buck mortality on the North Olympic Peninsula, and will provide preliminary results on a study designed to answer questions about cougar population genetics, movement patterns, and prey selection.

• April 9 — A Witness to Change, by Janis Burger, Hurricane Ridge interpreter with Olympic National Park.

Burger will share photos and experiences gleaned over a 37-year career as a seasonal biological technician and longtime Hurricane Ridge interpreter.

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