Members of the Mary Ball chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, from left, Coral Hileman of Federal Way, Pam Gassman of Tacoma and Lori Gibson of Oakville, enjoy some time together as they discuss garments from the 1770s. (Matthew Nash/Olympic Peninsula News Group)

Members of the Mary Ball chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, from left, Coral Hileman of Federal Way, Pam Gassman of Tacoma and Lori Gibson of Oakville, enjoy some time together as they discuss garments from the 1770s. (Matthew Nash/Olympic Peninsula News Group)

Colonial Festival adapts with living history camp

Organizers hope to restore battle reenactments in 2021

AGNEW — Reenactments of the “shot heard round the world” were silent this year, but living history continued in a more subdued effort for the Northwest Colonial Festival.

In its sixth year, organizers for the four-day event that ended Sunday adapted it into a living history encampment military drill weekend due to COVID-19 regulations.

One of the reenactors, Dennis Lawler of Sequim, said a few soldiers practiced drills such as marching, and holding and shooting muskets.

He’s participated with the event since its second year, and he took turns dressing as a British soldier and a colonist this year.

“At night we talk about the future, because everyone is anxious to do things,” Lawler said.

“We’re hoping it’ll be better next year.”

Vern Frykholm, a mainstay at the Northwest Colonial Festival portraying George Washington, shows off his mask made by Pam Gassman of Tacoma. He said with COVID-19 regulations in place, he and other portrayers are looking into creating educational podcasts and Zoom calls for schools/classrooms. (Matthew Nash/Olympic Peninsula News Group)

Vern Frykholm, a mainstay at the Northwest Colonial Festival portraying George Washington, shows off his mask made by Pam Gassman of Tacoma. He said with COVID-19 regulations in place, he and other portrayers are looking into creating educational podcasts and Zoom calls for schools/classrooms. (Matthew Nash/Olympic Peninsula News Group)

Many previously scheduled events, such as reenactments of the Battle of Lexington and the Battle of Concord Bridge, weren’t performed this year due to state regulations restricting large gatherings; however, visitors could go into the campground to see reenactors in period-appropriate dress as they led demonstrations on how to make tools and garments.

Organizers said it was free to visit during George Washington Inn/Washington Lavender Farm’s regular hours at 939 Finn Hall Road.

Masks were required in enclosures such as the farm store.

For more information on future events, visit facebook.com/colonialfestival and colonialfestival.com.

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