Senate votes to extend college financial aid to state Dreamers

By Alex Visser

WNPA Olympia News Bureau

OLYMPIA — A bipartisan effort in the Senate has passed a bill that would extend financial opportunities in higher education to some undocumented immigrant students in Washington state.

Senate Bill 5074, which was passed Wednesday, makes a couple of existing scholarships available to undocumented students who are eligible under previously-established guidelines.

Legislative District 24 senator Kevin Van De Wege, D-Sequim, voted in favor of the bill, which has now gone to the House for consideration. District 24 covers Clallam and Jefferson counties and part of Grays Harbor County.

In 2003 the state Legislature passed House Bill 1079, which allowed undocumented students to pay in-state tuition at Washington colleges so long as they had received a high school diploma, lived in the state for three years prior to graduation and had continued living in the state since then.

SB 5074 extends that standard to include a number of state scholarships, grants and loans.

Former President Barack Obama in 2012 issued the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals order, known as DACA, which allowed undocumented youth who arrived in the United States before the age of 16 the ability to acquire a two-year period of stay. DACA recipients could renew their status at the end of each period.

DACA students have come to be known as “Dreamers,” after the DREAM Act, a Congressional bill that would write similar protections into federal law but has so far failed to pass federal legislation.

President Donald Trump rescinded DACA in September 2017, with implementation of his order delayed for six months, allowing recipients whose documents expire in that period to renew their status before March 6. A White House memo urged others to use the six months to prepare for their deportation.

Washington state’s Legislature passed the REAL Hope Act in 2014, which allowed undocumented students to receive state-funded financial aid as long as they meet the criteria established in HB 1079.

SB 5074 extends that standard to include a number of state scholarships, grants and loans. Prime sponsor Sen. David Frockt, D-Seattle, said the new bill provides an extra sense of security to Washington’s undocumented students at a time when federal policy is unsettling.

“I cannot think of a more appropriate statement for this Senate to make at a time when the futures of thousands of young people in our state and across the country are up in the air,” Frockt said. “In Washington, we recognize their value as students and as leaders in the only country they have ever known.”

Frockt’s bill passed in the Senate via a 38-11 vote.

Sen. Kevin Ranker, D-Orcas Island, was one of several who spoke in support of the bill. Ranker serves as chair of the Senate Higher Education and Workforce Development Committee, which moved the bill to the senate floor.

Ranker thanked fellow committee members Sen. Brad Hawkins, R-Spokane and Sen. Mark Miloscia, R-Federal Way, for moving the bill in a bipartisan fashion. Miloscia said passage of the bill was the morally correct, and promised a return of investment as well.

“Washington state will prosper if we make sure these sons and daughters, these brothers and sisters of ours, reach that final step,” Miloscia said. “This is the right thing to do, let’s vote for this.”

Voting no on the bill was Sen. Michael Baumgartner, R-Spokane, who said there was not enough funding to make up for additional students receiving aid.

________

This story is part of a series of news reports from the Washington State Legislature provided through a reporting internship sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association Foundation.

More in Politics

Kilmer meets with Hurricane Ridge group on funding amid federal shutdown

Without being able to open, board expects to lose at least $50,000

Things to watch in Washington Legislature this year

Mental health, education, environment, sexual harassment, public records top the list of priorities.

Proposed legislation would protect federal workers

U.S. Sen. Brian Schatz of Hawaii and U.S. Rep.… Continue reading

Chapman: Bond supermajority requirement unlikely to change

Don’t expect the 60 percent supermajority required for voter… Continue reading

Most Read