LEE HORTON'S OUTDOORS: Current dig features larger razor clams

By Lee Horton
Peninsula Daily News

THE RAZOR CLAM season keeps getting better.

The latest razor clam dig is in effect and runs through Monday.

Not only are the razor clams plentiful, but they are plenty big.

Dan Ayres, state Department of Fish and Wildlife coastal shellfish manager said the clams sampled in the days leading up to this dig were heavier than they were in previous tests.

“With all the plankton in the water, the clams seem to be 'fattening' up earlier than usual,” Ayres said in a news release.

“Those clams will make for some tasty meals after the next opening.”

Once again, this dig is scheduled for evening tides and no digging is allowed before noon on any beach.

Here are the dig's details, including days, low tides and participating beaches:

■ Today: 5:04 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach and Mocrocks.

■ Friday: 5:49 p.m.; -0.8 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach and Mocrocks.

■ Saturday: 6:32 p.m.; -0.7 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Mocrocks and Copalis.

■ Sunday: 7:13 p.m.; -0.3 feet; Twin Harbors, Long Beach and Mocrocks.

■ Monday: 7:53 p.m.; +0.3 feet; Twin Harbors.

Diggers are allowed to harvest 15 razor clams per day and are required to keep the first 15 they dig.

Sport clam opener

The sport clam season is opening early at Dosewallips State Park in Jefferson County.

The season will open Saturday because surveys indicated that the clam population at Dosewallips could support a longer season, one similar to what the beach had last year.

The earlier opening date provides a more continuous recreational clamming opportunity in the Hood Canal area, particularly with this year's closure of nearby Point Whitney Tidelands.

Also, don't forget that oyster season is open year-round at Dosewallips.

Public meeting about salmon season

The annual controversy known as the salmon season kicks of with a public meeting in Olympia on Monday.

At this meeting, the state will preview the upcoming salmon returns and potential season.

The meeting is slated for 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in room 172 of the Natural Resources Building at 1111 Washington Street S.E. in Olympia.

The public will be able to talk to fishery managers about the preseason forecast as well as participate in work sessions that focus on possible salmon fisheries and conservations issues.

The state also has scheduled public meetings to discuss regional salmon issues.

The North Olympic Peninsula meeting will be Thursday, March 20, at the Trinity Methodist Church at 100 South Black Ave. in Sequim from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

These meetings, which involve representatives from federal, state and tribal governments and recreational and commercial fishing industries — is known as the North of Falcon process.

The upcoming salmon seasons will be officially adopted in early April.

Quick limit

Speaking of salmon, Brenda and Wayne Chisholm of Port Townsend had a quick trip earlier this week.

“We went out fishing Midchannel [Bank] Sunday and set our gear up and hooked a fish,” Brenda Chisholm wrote in an email.

“Wayne was marking his fish in his license when I hooked another.

“Twenty minutes back at the dock, limited. Best fishing ever.”

Tour de Dungeness

The 17th annual Tour de Dungeness bike race will be held Saturday, March 8, and Saturday, March 15.

Riders in different categories will compete in a 12-mile course that includes Lotzgesell, Cays, East Anderson, Sequim Dungeness Way, Woodcock and Kitchen-Dick roads.

Organizers expect as many as 450 riders from the Puget Sound region and eastern Washington.

The races start at 9:45 a.m. each day, and will go on regardless of the weather.

The start and finish, as well as parking, is located at the north end of Kithen-Dick Road, across from the Dungeness Recreation area.

For more information or to register, contact Mike Van Doren at 360-775-7796 or 360-417-5257 (after 5 p.m.).

Hunter education

The next hunter education course in Forks will begin Monday at the West End Sportsmen's Club.

The course will be held March 3, 5, 10 and 12 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

The final test is Saturday, March 15 at 9 a.m.

The course teaches firearms safety, wildlife conservation and sportsmanship.

Students must attend all classes for the opportunity to receive a hunter education student certificate.

Washington law requires first-time hunters born after Jan. 1, 1972, to successfully complete a hunter education class in order to purchase a hunting license.

The course is taught by volunteer instructors who have been certified by the state Department of Fish and Wildlife to conduct student courses.

The hunter education program is open to all levels of experience. Most students who successfully complete this course are 10 years or older.

A parent or guardian is required to attend the first night of class with their student and are encouraged to attend all classes. Students younger than 10 years must be accompanied by a parent or guardian must accompany to all classes.

Pre-register online at www.wdfw.wa.gov. Follow prompts to Hunter Education, Traditional Class and Registration.

There also will be a field test for online hunter education students Saturday, March 8, at 9 a.m. at the West End Sportsmen Club.

For more information, phone Randy Mesenbrink at 360-374-5718.

Fly tying demo

Waters West in Port Angeles (360-417-0937) is holding free fly tying demonstration Saturday at 1 p.m.

Jerry French of Olympic Peninsula Skagit Tactics, will be tying his favorite winter steelhead patterns.

The demo is free and open to everyone.

________

Sports Editor Lee Horton's outdoors column appears here Thursdays and Fridays. He can be reached at 360-417-3525 or at lhorton@peninsuladailynews.com.

Last modified: February 26. 2014 6:28PM
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